ILLEGAL GARBAGE DUMPING IN FRONT OF VACANT HOUSE MOVES AROUND CORNER TO ABANDONED PLAYGROUND

garbage7.21.15 019A vacant house owned by the typical slumlord, which was chopped up with illegal apartments and then abandoned, had a major garbage dumping problem, which took months to get taken care of. This vacant house (108-50 171st Pl) was a major garbage dumping  site, but has been finally cleaned up and now more dumping is taking place, but this time, it has moved around the corner on 171st Street in front of the notorious abandoned playground. Besides being a major eyesore,  this is a major health issue that attracts various rodents including rats. Of course ghetto trash is to blame for well, ghetto trash, BUT when the city and elected officials keep ignoring problems, well, then shit like this continues.Garbage 12.31.15 001Garbage 12.31.15 002Garbage 12.31.15 003

This was an issue that has been going on for years, when then Councilman Leroy Comrie told community activist Pamela Hazel, that he would take care of that (http://www.qchron.com/editions/eastern/her-crusade-to-clean-up-jamaica/article_4907d4a7-37ed-54eb-88c5-55543ee52d1d.html). Well, Comrie is now Senator and the problem still continues.

Just more ghetto crap in a ghetto community that is not properly being serviced by the city or local elected officials.

In the meantime, NOTHING is being done about the many illegal signs that are plastered all over the community on city property, like telephone poles, stating “We Buy Houses”, “Cash for Junk Cars”, etc. This “We Buy Houses” sign at 106th Ave/173rd Street was seen all around that area including streets near St. Alban Park. While riding my bike, I must have counted in a few blocks at least 20 of these signs.Garbage 12.31.15 004

If ignoring the problem is considering fixing the problem, then Jamaica is all good.

 

WHY CONTINUE TO HAVE SURVEY AFTER SURVEY OR STUDY AFTER STUDY IF THERE IS NO IMPROVEMENT IN DOWNTOWN JAMAICA AND THINGS ARE STILL SHIT

Just yesterday, I posted a Southeast Queens survey that was being conducted by the Queens Chamber of Commerce, which is below:

Southeast Queens Residents Survey

As part of an effort to understand and improve the retail offerings in the area, the Queens Chamber of Commerce has composed a brief online survey for local residents to complete. Kindly take a few minutes to complete the survey and share your local shopping, dining and healthcare experiences.  

BUT and this is a big BUT, why continue to have survey after survey or study after study, if shit is never going to happen and the area of Jamaica continues to look like shit year after year with little or no improvement.

When I first moved here 5 years ago, the Jamaica BID (at that time under Laurel Brown) did pretty much the same survey (as did Sutphin BID), then about a year later or two, another one asking pretty much the same questions: “What kind of retail, restaurants would you like to see”, etc, etc. After the first survey, they found out that many wanted better retail, better food choices and that millions of dollars where being lost to the community due to people going outside the community to shop, dine and spend money because Jamaica had low-rent, low-class third world ghetto shit retail and food choices, an ugly downtown area filled with garbage and majorly poor customer service.

Yet, survey after survey, NOTHING CHANGED. Wait I take that back, since I moved here, more beauty supply stores opened (I think there are about 15 in the downtown area), more crappy retail opened and I mean crappy third world shit that you would see in some third world country slum flea market and poor food choices. Oh and GARBAGE all over. OH and shitty customer service.

Yet, nothing really positive took place, with the exception of City Rib, which closed after about three years to open as Moda and Premium Clothing at Jamaica Ave & Sutphin, nothing of quality came in and the area continue to be garbage strewn.

I guess these surveys and studies make the powers that be fool the people into thinking that “hey, we are doing something”, when in a sense this is just a false security and pretty much means nothing, not to mention that these surveys and studies cost big time dollars.

HINT: If you continue to have a garbage strewn, shit retail business district, you will continue to attract the shitty people who toss that garbage on the ground. DON’T YOU GET THAT. Garbage begats Garbage. Quality people do not want to shop or dine in a shit ghetto that has nothing to offer but cheap bling, crappy clothing and shit food choices, plus tons of crappy electronic stores.

So in the meantime, this is what all the surveys and studies have given you:

Moda Grill and other stuff12.19.15 009jamaica 12.5.15 019

Is this an example of being on "the right track".

Is this an example of being on “the right track”.

Jamaica crap11.21.15 008Jamaica crap11.21.15 007Jamaica crap11.21.15 006Jamaica crap11.21.15 003

This gentlemen just adds to the delight

This gentlemen just adds to the delight

Jamaica in the box retail

Jamaica in the box retail

jamaica 12.5.15 020

These people had to climb over this shit to get into their car. And this is in the downtown section, not far from the LIRR station, where the jazz concerts are held.

These people had to climb over this shit to get into their car. And this is in the downtown section, not far from the LIRR station, where the jazz concerts are held.

The epitome of Jamaica.

The epitome of Jamaica.

QUEENS WAY BEHIND ON VISION ZERO, ESPECIALLY IN SOUTHEAST QUEENS & COMMUNITIES OF COLOR

Why is it not surprising that Southeast Queens (Community Board 12, 13) and some other areas, mostly of color, are way behind with Vision Zero and it’s implementation and enforcement of laws. Community Board 4, which covers Elmhurst & Corona, is where a mother and her children were seriously injured recently when they were hit by a cement truck on a residential street when school was letting out (http://jacksonheightspost.com/2-children-adult-injured-after-being-struck-by-cement-truck-in-corona/).

Southeast Queens, including Jamaica, has a major problem of illegal parking of overnight tractor trailer trucks and an even bigger problem of large trucks using residential streets as shortcuts, while for the most part, a lack of enforcement has been weak (exception, my street of 170th, which I have been documenting for over a year and have been filing hundreds and hundreds of complaints has seen a major drop-off, but this is just one street of many residential streets that trucks use).

Plenty of blame to go around from the horrible city agency, Department of Transportation (DOT), which cannot even fix a fucking pot hole right) to our Mayor, Queens Borough President and of course our local community elected officials who are not doing their jobs representing their communities properly.

Notice that such areas as Forest Hills and Long Island City are not part of the “weak” Vision Zero implementation areas, but yet Astoria is, which also has a major truck issue is. Again, much blame goes to elected officials of those areas who are the first line of defense.

So no doubt that Vision Zero has been another failed NYC government program, which sounded good on paper, but as usual is not being properly implemented along with a lack of proper enforcement. Maybe it is time for DOT to bring back their truck enforcement unit in Queens as opposed to allowing this to fall on already overburdened precincts like the 103rd in Jamaica. But wait, that would make sense.

Yes, government has not only gotten so big full of wasteful spending, but as it gets bigger, it becomes less and less effective and NYC is a perfect example with wasted positions such as Borough Presidents and the Public Advocate office, both which have been stripped years ago of power and are mostly just for show, but wastes major amounts of tax payers money and showing ZERO results, pretty much like VISION ZERO.

In the meantime local leaders like Ruben Wills are wasting time on gang violent bills which include long term studies on a problem we already know the answer to and of course the prerequisite street naming ceremony photo ops and other useless bullshit. Real problems, forget about it, that would take actual work and commitment by these fools.

Look at the size of this truck driving illegally on 170th

Look at the size of this truck driving illegally on 170th

Trucks10.22.15 005Trucks 8.20.15 004garbage7.21.15 011

The only way an 18-wheel tractor trailer was able to make a wide turn from Liberty Avenue onto 170th Street was by jumping its rear wheels onto the sidewalk, coming within a few feet of a reporter, who was almost too startled to be able to take this photograph in time. Source : Louis Flores

The only way an 18-wheel tractor trailer was able to make a wide turn from Liberty Avenue onto 170th Street was by jumping its rear wheels onto the sidewalk, coming within a few feet of a reporter, who was almost too startled to be able to take this photograph in time. Source : Louis Flores

A dump truck was driven on 170th Street during Progress Queens’ inspection tour of commercial traffic in Jamaica, Queens. Source : Louis Flores

A dump truck was driven on 170th Street during Progress Queens’ inspection tour of commercial traffic in Jamaica, Queens. Source : Louis Flores

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From Queens Times Ledger:

Queens lags behind on Vision Zero stats

Make Queens Safer, a grassroots street-safety advocacy organization, contends Queens is falling behind the other boroughs in reducing traffic injuries and fatalities over the past year.

The group’s statistical analysis of Queens’ progress in Mayor Bill de Blasio’s signature traffic safety project Vision Zero finds that the borough is struggling with traffic enforcement and motorist injuries, according to a report released this week.

Queens has faced a 2.3 percent uptick in injuries to motorists and passengers since 2013 and is now the only borough where injuries to drivers and passengers exceed 2013 levels, when Vision Zero began, the report said. Throughout the rest of the city injuries to motor vehicle occupants are down, declining by 7 percent in Brooklyn and in 16 percent in Manhattan. Queens also had a 9% increase in cyclist injuries compared to 2013.

“In five districts (Community Boards 1, 4, 7, 12 and 13), implementation of Vision Zero has been particularly weak and action to jump-start street safety improvements is most urgently needed,” the report said.

Compounding the problem, several Queens neighborhoods are seeing significantly fewer traffic tickets written for these violations by their local police precincts relative to 2013 levels, the advocacy group said. The biggest declines occurred in the 109th and 110th precincts, where ticketing was down by more than 30 percent, with the most significant drops in tickets for cell-phone use.

As part of the Vision Zero effort, NYPD received resources to hire additional traffic safety officers.

“Based on the statistics presented here, there is little evidence that these greater workforce numbers are translating into greater enforcement on the ground. NYPD should provide an accounting of how it is using its Vision Zero budget allocations,” the report said.

Yet the report had some bright spots.

Since November 2014, there have been 69 overall traffic fatalities in Queens, down 26 percent from the 93 people killed in 2013, the Vision Zero benchmark year. Citywide, there has been a 21 percent decline in fatalities. The downward trend points to the modest success of Vision Zero’s second year. But in Queens there were nine traffic fatalities during this November alone.

Some of the stars of the report included the 104th, 107th, 108th and 112th precincts, which were commended for reducing traffic injuries and increasing enforcement.

In October, Vision Zero came to the 104th Precinct. The city Department of Transportation, along with the officers of the 104th Precinct, conducted an educational and enforcement initiative. In the second week of the initiative, the precinct focused on enforcement, targeting hazardous violations such as speeding, improper turns and texting while driving.

The report ended inconclusively:

“This analysis clearly raises more questions than it answers. It does not explain why injury or fatality rates are rising or falling in specific areas, or why enforcement patterns appear to be changing in certain ways.”

 

TAKE A SOUTHEAST QUEENS RESIDENTS SURVEY AND TELL THE QUEENS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE HOW SHITTY THE RETAIL OFFERING IS IN THE AREA

The survey (after the photos) only takes a few minutes, so let the folks know why most of us do not shop or dine in Jamaica and spend our money elsewhere. Because of shit like this, not too mention the poor low-class ghetto customer service:

Moda Grill and other stuff12.19.15 009jamaica 12.5.15 026

Jamaica in the box retail

Jamaica in the box retail

jamaica 12.5.15 020

Is this an example of being on "the right track".

Is this an example of being on “the right track”.

jamaica 12.5.15 028Jamaica crap11.21.15 007Jamaica crap11.21.15 003

——————————————————

Southeast Queens Residents Survey

As part of an effort to understand and improve the retail offerings in the area, the Queens Chamber of Commerce has composed a brief online survey for local residents to complete. Kindly take a few minutes to complete the survey and share your local shopping, dining and healthcare experiences.  

BOTH THE RIGHT CONSERVATIVES & LEFT LIBERALS ARE NOT QUITE TRUTHFUL ON RADICAL ISLAMIC TERROR

The problem when you sway to far to the right or too far to the left, a lot of common sense is missed. There is a much middle ground, especially when it comes to radical Islamic terror. But then the government loves to splinter us all like this.

Good point is brought up by a former NYPD detective.

———————————————————

From The Daily News:

Americans are right to be afraid: Respect the second half of the word ‘Islamophobia’

NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
Wednesday, December 30, 2015, 5:00 AM
What people are afraid of US CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION / HANDOUT/EPA

What people are afraid of

I’d like to talk to you about a dirty word that I’ve seen popping up all over: Islamophobia. In recent months, reporters, scholars, politicians and even the President have spoken out about the evils of fearing or hating a religion and those who practice it.

Media outlets routinely quote statistics about incidents of discrimination and even violence against Muslims and Arabs in America, creating the powerful impression that a new form of blind bigotry is rampant.

Anti-Muslim actions are deplorable. Our nation is founded on the principles of religious freedom and racial equality, and no one should be forced to suffer for their religion or national origin.

Yet everyone seems to be forgetting about the second half of the word: phobia. Fear. Americans are afraid. They have very good reason to be afraid. Americans are angry. They have every right to be that, too.

ISIS CALLS FOR NEW FIGHTERS, GETS MOCKED BY MUSLIMS

We know why: 9/11, the Boston Marathon, Paris, San Bernardino, the list goes on. Innocent people have been killed by bands of terrorists motivated by a religious ideology that says we are evil because we are infidels. We are of the West, or modern, or American.

Will such attacks become ever more common? They very well might.

In response, some terrified and enraged people are lashing out at the easiest, most available target, perhaps because they feel powerless in the face of a determined enemy. While the expression of those feelings may be offensive, that fact does not delegitimize the fear.

In a recent speech, President Obama warned us not to allow “this fight (to) be defined as a war between America and Islam.”

But to many Americans, how can the struggle not be seen that way? Our enemy is not a country or a government with any specific grievance or political objective. Nor is it any one terrorist organization.

The Boston Marathon bombers did not claim affiliation with any cell or larger entity other than Islam, and the FBI is currently questioning whether or not the San Bernardino shooters actually had ties to ISIS.

ISIS LEADER LINKED TO PARIS ATTACK MASTERMIND KILLED

They were motivated by their faith as they see it. The threat of Islamic terror is not confined by borders. Its only goal is the full-scale destruction of the non-Islamic West in the name of an Islamic god.

We have to be allowed to say that, and to understand that a violent strain of Islam is indeed fueling murder.

But from our leaders and the media, we get dangerously mixed messages. On the one hand, we are told, constantly, to “say something” if we “see something” — to report any and all suspicious behavior. On the other hand, we are warned not to be Islamophobic.

How are we supposed to subject potentially dangerous behavior to common-sense scrutiny if we are afraid of being branded Islamophobic?

We are not at war with any specific Muslim. The vast majority of Muslims in America are peaceful, law-abiding people. But we are certainly at war with radical Islam.

And while some Americans may be overgeneralizing, it is unfair to mislabel actions motivated by justified fear as acts of bigotry. Bigotry is baseless. These people have come to their fears because of real evidence.

In fact, those who talk about the country’s supposedly resurgent Islamophobia are just as guilty of misplacing blame as the supposed Islamophobes.

Obama spoke out against discriminatory acts of Islamophobia by saying, “Muslim Americans are our friends and our neighbors, our co-workers, our sports heroes — and, yes, they are our men and women in uniform.”

Absolutely true. But only part of the picture. One of those men in uniform, Army Maj. Nidal Hasan, killed 13 people at Fort Hood in 2009. His reasons were explicitly rooted in radical Islamic beliefs. The marathon bombers had friends. The San Bernardino killers were liked by their neighbors.

I am not supporting paranoia. Most American Muslims love their country and are peaceful. Many of them hate terrorists with every bit as much fervor as Christians and Jews, if not more.

But if we shouldn’t take small groups of terrorists as representative of all Islamic peoples, neither should we take a few dozen incidents of Islamophobic discrimination in a nation of more than 300 million people as indicative of any national trend toward bigotry.

We are all being persecuted for our beliefs. For some Americans, it is because they are Muslim. But for most of us, for the nation and the Western world as a whole, it is because we are not Muslim.

We all have the right to be afraid. Some of us may make bad choices based on that fear, but the only way that fear will subside is if the spreaders of fear are defeated. It’s time to stop obsessing about the word “Islamophobia” and remember who the real bad guys are.

Dietl, a former NYPD detective, is founder of Beau Dietl & Associates.