TAKE ALL YOUR JAMAICA STUDIES AND SHOVE THEM – THE DAMN AREA NEEDS CLEANED-UP PERIOD & CONSTANT COMPLAINTS SHOULD NOT BE CONTINUALLY IGNORED

I read shit like below and it pisses me off because there is never any mention on the present and what to do NOW (ironic the name Jamaica Now Action Plan, which does not focus on NOW nor much ACTION) as far as cleaning up the damn area which has a big garbage problem that contantly gets swept under the rug (the problem, not the garbage).

Nowhere in the article below is any mention of this major quality of life issue, which deters many people from coming to this community and a reason why  many residents spend money outside of it. I mean who wants to see all this damn garbage, who wants to see junked cars placed on sidewalks, who wants to see piles of rocks and debris on streets and who wants to deal with constant bothering from beggars and and homeless.

None of this shit is enticing. AGAIN, WHAT DON’T YOU FUCKING GET.

Studies don’t make garbage go away or get communities cleaned up. ACTION does along with very competent leaders and ENFORCEMENT, which seems pretty rare.

147th Pl between Jamaica & Archer Ave. 5.20.16

147th Pl between Jamaica & Archer Ave. 5.20.16

147th Pl between Jamaica & Archer Ave. 5.20.16

147th Pl between Jamaica & Archer Ave. 5.20.16

148 Pl and Jamaica Ave, sitting since almost beginning of May 2016

148 Pl and Jamaica Ave, sitting since almost beginning of May 2016

Downtown Jamaica, UNACCEPTABLE

Downtown Jamaica, UNACCEPTABLE

Stuff5.14.16 019Stuff5.14.16 042Hillside avegarbage and teddy 5.7.16 007Garbage 4.23.16 007

I MEAN REALLY. Totally ILLEGAL.

I MEAN REALLY. Totally ILLEGAL.

—————————————–

From Queens Press:

RPA Previews Plan to Revitalize Downtown Jamaica

BY RODNEY D. GANTT

During the Greater Jamaica Development Corporation’s 49th annual meeting, a representative of its parent organization, the Regional Plan Association, unveiled preliminary findings from their report, Marketing Assessment and Opportunities in Jamaica. The report was part an ongoing effort to revitalize Jamaica known as the Fourth Regional Plan.

The meeting was held on May. 18, at the Harvest Room, located at 90-40 160 St.

Pierina Sanchez, director of the New York Regional Plan Association, an organization that works to promote revitalization projects and growth in regions throughout the Tri-State area, gave her presentation of the Fourth Regional Plan, explaining how it applied to New York City and the Jamaica region.

Pierina Sanchez, director of the New York Regional Plan Association, speaks at the Greater Jamaica Development Corporation meeting at the Harvest Room on Wednesday. Photo by Walter Karling

Pierina Sanchez, director of the New York Regional Plan Association, speaks at the Greater Jamaica Development Corporation meeting at the Harvest Room on Wednesday. Photo by Walter Karling

“We’ve been looking at Jamaica since the 1960’s because of its critical infrastructure; this isn’t something new.  However, since that time when we predicted we’d see a lot more growth in Jamaica, we haven’t actually seen that promise fulfilled,” said Sanchez. “We do think Jamaica could do more, more for its residents, to reduce inequality and create more jobs.”

Sanchez explained that the goal of the plans, which the RPA started working on in 2012, was to understand the problems the regions were facing.

To determine the issues facing the Jamaica area, the RPA worked together with the GJDC on a series of studies including a market study, a build out analysis with consideration to the 2007 rezoning of the Jamaica area and ideas for mobility improvement. The preliminary findings of the market studies found there was a significant retail gap in the area.

“There is about $148,000,000 that could be spent in Downtown Jamaica, but it’s actually being spent elsewhere,” said Sanchez. This was just one of several issues the studies found.

In part two of the plan -the build out stage- the association took into account the 2007 rezoning and determined what they were able to do based on what the rezoning would allow. Sanchez pointed out the rezoning freed up a lot of excess capacity in a quite a few areas. In her presentation Sanchez demonstrated “loops,” areas encompassing parts of Sutphin Boulevard, York College and Hillside Avenue where land space could be utilized.

The final aspect of her presentation, Sanchez referred to as “RPA’s bread and butter”- mobility. She explained RPA identified several characteristics that make transit “attractive.” They included frequency, proximity, no crowding and safety. Sanchez said the RPA is looking at the four major transportations in Jamaica: the buses, the subway, Air-Tram and the LIRR, and analyzing them based on the characteristics.

“We’re going to be looking at things like fare restructure for the LIRR. There are many proposals out there right now, one that RPA is looking at is actually LIRR fare to the city ticket price – making it $4.50,” said Sanchez. The group is also thinking of converting the Atlantic Avenue branch into subway use to give Queens residents a “low-cost connection to Brooklyn and into Manhattan.”

Sanchez emphasized that the report was only preliminary and the RPA would be conducting more research. Both Sanchez and Knight acknowledged that with all the revitalization projects set to occur, residents in the area have voiced concerns.

“I think people are afraid of gentrification and in this community I don’t see that as a significant factor because I don’t see a lot of people being moved out of the community –  I see a lot of people moving in,” said Knight. “I think they have a right to be concerned because change is difficult and you never know what’s going to happen but like I said folks will be able to participate and move into some of those circumstances.”

“I think the study is going in the right direction, these were preliminary findings and so I think those findings are sound but we need to do more work,” she added.

GJDC President Hope Knight also spoke about the various developmental projects that have been announced and have already begun construction. She focused on one site in particular on the corner of Sutphin Boulevard and Archer Avenue where demolition will begin in a matter days or weeks- the location for the new affordable housing project, The Crossing.

“It will contain 585 affordable units as well as 100,000 square feet of retail space,” said Knight.

The first three floors will be will be designated retail space, with two housing towers located above, according to the GJDC website. Construction was set to begin late last year and is expected to be finished early 2018.

“I see the sort of economic benefits, I see local contractors and businesses being able to participate on this project and drive revenue to those businesses. I also see the opportunity for local residents to access employment opportunities as a result of the retail we’ll create,” said Knight. “This change in activity will bring about significant revitalization in this community and we continue to be happy about that,” said Knight.

 

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