THE CITY MUST CRACK DOWN ON BLIGHTED ABANDONED PROPERTIES AND HOLD OWNERS 100% RESPONSIBLE

Cambria Heights eyesore at 130-06 233rd St. Been going on for close to a decade.

Cambria Heights eyesore at 130-06 233rd St. Been going on for close to a decade.

The state of Jamaica, Queens and eventually our country if we stay on this course.

The state of Jamaica, Queens and eventually our country if we stay on this course.

James Fobb House. Vacant for so long and a constant source of garbage dumping and an eyesore to a community that is already and eyesore

James Fobb House. Vacant for so long and a constant source of garbage dumping and an eyesore to a community that is already and eyesore

Almost every neighborhood in Queens (good & bad) has abandoned houses that are a major blight on blocks and communities and they end up sitting for years, falling into disrepair, becoming garbage dumps, criminal and homeless hangouts, yet this damn city, with the highest taxes in the country as usual does shit to hold owners responsible and make them clean up their messes in a short period of time.

In the article below, the blighted houses are right next to each other on a very nice block of Fresh Meadows right near Cunningham Park. I remember the original homes that were there and remember seeing them torn down and new ones built but would notice over and over that everything seem stalled and I knew they would end up being complete eyesores and the city would do shit, which is exactly what happened and exactly how what the city has done, SHIT.

In Jamaica these places litter the community all over and of course not a damn thing gets done to fix the situation.

Janet McCreesh from Broadway-Flushing  has this to say on the issue:

Senator Avella introduced legislation S5043. The bill requires a certificate of occupancy be obtained within four years of the initial permit for construction and/or alteration or the department of buildings may demolish the structure and return the site to a clean and safe condition at the property owner’s expense.

Property owners who are either unable to complete construction or obtain a certificate of occupancy within four years should bear the burden of having any uncompleted or uninhabitable structures demolished and return the property to a clean and safe condition. Responsible property owners should not be made to share the difficult financial situations that abandoned property owners may be suffering and it is more than reasonable to expect that such properties must either be completed and receive a certificate of occupancy or be demolished within 4 years from the start of construction and that buildings which have been officially “sealed” by the city should not be allowed to languish in that condition for more than two years.

This bill needs the support of the people and we must all make an effort to tell our Senate to pass this bill. We urge everyone to send emails to avella@nysenate.gov, little@nysenate.gov, bonacic@nysenate.gov, pboyle@nysenate.gov, espailla@nysenate.gov, gallivan@nysenate.gov, lkrueger@senate.ny.us and panepinto@nysenate.gov Tell them you support Bill S5043 and you want them to support it too!

Janet McCreesh
President
Broadway-Flushing Homeowners’ Association
Can this city do anything right besides make a $50 fucking hamburger. CHRIST!
So the least you can do is send off an email to the senators above. People love to bitch but rarely take the initiative to actually do something, waiting for someone else to step up to the plate.
Dangerous falling apart vacant homes with garbage

Dangerous falling apart vacant homes with garbage

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From Queens Times Ledger:

Abandoned houses are blight on neighborhoods

By Bob Harris

In every neighborhood there are one or more houses which are abandoned or partly built and they make the neighborhood look terrible. Some people have just abandoned their houses or they tore down the old house and started building, but either for financial or zoning reasons have stopped working on the building, perhaps for years. The neighbors are stuck with these eyesores and can’t really enjoy their own property.

Some people start building but the workers don’t come for days or even weeks. They do some work, then disappear. This leaves a dilapidated construction fence and often piles of construction materials, machinery and piles of dirt. Sometimes the dirt is blown around by the wind or a storm and covers the property of nearby neighbors and seeps into their houses so neighbors can’t enjoy their own well-maintained property.

We pay high real estate taxes, water bills, fines, and all kinds of fees yet the city cannot seem to make a few builders build reasonably fast and thus maintain our quality of life.

75-46 193rd St. and 75-50 193rd St. in Fresh Meadows.

75-46 193rd St. and 75-50 193rd St. in Fresh Meadows.

Zombie houses in the photo above are in the West Cunningham Park Civic Association, Inc. area, at 75-46 193rd St. and 75-50 193rd St. in Fresh Meadows. The community has complained to every local legislator and city agency available yet the buildings have looked like this for about three years and had construction fences around them for about five years previously. The years pass and frustration grows.

Yes, private property is private property, but there comes a point where if the property is a detriment to the community or presents a physical danger or disrupts the quality of life in a neighborhood, then the city should do something. When it wants to, the city uses eminent domain to take away private property for public use. Sometimes the use is questionable. There comes a time when the city must act to preserve communities. What happened to the concept of “failure to maintain” property?

ECB (hazardous condition) Violations have been served on these two buildings, but nothing has been done to correct the violations. They still look like this. There are other buildings in this and other neighborhoods which look like this. What isn’t something being done?

Ben Rosof, one of my neighbors, made these suggestions. A builder should have six to nine months or even a year in a difficult situation to build on a lot. He should not start multiple jobs and spread construction over years. A builder must show he has 110 percent of the money to build when he files his plans. A bond must be posed to protect the neighbors and to pay neighbors for their inconveniences such as noise and dust over everything and loss of quality of life. There must be mutual respect for the community by a builder or homeowner who is doing the building.

 

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