ARTICLE STATES QUEENS (AND JAMAICA) NEED MORE RETAIL – WELL ACTUALLY WE NEED LESS CHEAP GHETTO THIRD WORLD RETAIL

In the article below:

Without more diverse options, Melva Miller, Deputy Borough President to Melinda Katz, is concerned that shoppers will be more likely to leave the borough and head to outlets on Long Island.

What,  you mean civilized non low-class, non-ghetto folks don’t want to shop at all the crap retail on Jamaica Ave. You just figuring this shit out. Of course we will spend our money elsewhere, we don’t want to see all the crap retail and the crap people too.

As officials consider tackling the issue, they should look first to Jamaica, where foot traffic is reaching all-time highs but retail diversity is sorely lacking.

YEAH, look at ghetto Jamaica and ghetto Jamaica Ave and all the low-class ghetto third world shit there (dozens of 99 cent stores, beauty supply stores and other assorted shit). Again no shit, retail diversity is lacking (13 beauty supply stores in the downtown section) and you are just figuring this out.

Oh AND CLEAN THE FUCKING PLACE UP. It is a ghetto strewn garbage dump and that is just the people, then there is the actual garbage. But keep on dumping more and more homeless shelters in the area, so the already ghetto trash folks can mix with  the incoming homeless shelter trash to really FUCK UP THE AREA even more.

I love these stupid articles where “leaders” are finally figuring out shit that folks in Jamaica have known for decades.

A little behind the curb Melva. Wow, these folks get paid for this.

 

A third world flea market. Look at this slop just thrown down on the sidewalk.

A third world flea market. Look at this slop just thrown down on the sidewalk.

Jamaica in the box retail

Jamaica in the box retail

jamaica 12.5.15 028jamaica 12.5.15 025

Is this an example of being on "the right track".

Is this an example of being on “the right track”.

jamaica 12.5.15 019jamaica ave2

ILLEGAL. Blocking of sidewalks

ILLEGAL. Blocking of sidewalks

——————————

From Queens Tribune:

Queens Needs More Retail to Serve its Growing Population

 June 23, 2016
BY FELIX CIAMPA

 As new development continues to transform Queens, the borough desperately needs more diverse retail outlets to support that growth and strengthen the local economy.

Without more diverse options, Melva Miller, Deputy Borough President to Melinda Katz, is concerned that shoppers will be more likely to leave the borough and head to outlets on Long Island. Miller noted at ULI New York’s Borough Development Series forum on June 9, that shopping migration is already beginning to take place — and the numbers reveal why.

While Queens’ population of 2.3 million nearly matches Long Island’s 2.8 million, its supply of big-name retail — stores like H&M, Target and DSW — doesn’t even compare. The Greater Jamaica Development Corporation (GJDC) found that Long Island has around 170 of these high-profile shopping and dining outlets, while Queens only has 55, or less than a third as many.

That disparity will only lead to a widening gap and more missed chances for the borough’s economy as its population continues to grow. And that growth shows no signs of slowing down. According to U.S. Census data, more than 30 percent of New York City’s residential growth in 2015 took place in Queens, surpassing every other borough.

As officials consider tackling the issue, they should look first to Jamaica, where foot traffic is reaching all-time highs but retail diversity is sorely lacking.

Nearly half a million commuters pass through Jamaica each day, including more than 42,000 daily riders at the Jamaica Center subway stop, which is one of the busiest in the city. GJDC President Hope Knight told ULI New York’s audience that those visitors and residents simply aren’t able to access the retail options they want on Jamaica Avenue, which doesn’t provide the big-name options that shoppers are more likely to find outside the borough.

With thousands of mixed-income apartments and two chain hotels on the way, Knight called this an opportunity, rather than a problem — and real estate industry players should be listening. Jamaica is the kind of up-and-coming, transit-rich neighborhood that can and should serve as one of New York’s top hospitality hubs.

The good news is that the industry can also look to a few recent examples of successful retail growth in Queens, especially in Flushing. In that neighborhood, Sky View Parc has combined hundreds of condos with more than 700,000 square feet of retail space, providing the right mix needed to support a vibrant new community. Flushing Commons has taken a similarly effective approach by focusing on attracting a wide array of high-profile retail tenants, including Queens’ first Nordstrom Rack and Uniqlo outlets. Both developments have found success.

Applying those lessons to Jamaica and other neighborhoods will be the difference between losing more business to Long Island and building a diverse retail base that serves the needs of a growing borough.

ULI New York was proud to sponsor the June 9 forum to give voice to that important concern and help members of the real estate industry learn more about what can really drive the future of Queens. We hope public and private sector leaders will work together and make greater efforts to provide the borough’s residents and visitors with the retail diversity they demand and deserve.

Felix Ciampa is the executive director of the Urban Land Institute New York

 

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4 thoughts on “ARTICLE STATES QUEENS (AND JAMAICA) NEED MORE RETAIL – WELL ACTUALLY WE NEED LESS CHEAP GHETTO THIRD WORLD RETAIL

  1. Steinway St. in Astoria is a great example of a quality retail strip in Queens. If Jamaica Ave. were anything close to that the area would be somewhat better. Unfortunately I don’t see that happening anytime soon.

    I also find it funny that the articles mentions concerns about people going to shop in Long Island. That’s been already going on for ages with people who live in southeastern Queens. Green Acres Mall and other shopping in Nassau are a stone’s throw from some neighborhoods (Laurelton, Cambria Heights, Hollis, etc.). There is good retail in other neighborhoods and the very nice Queens Center Mall, but those places are farther away. Jamaica is almost like the commercial desert between a rock and a hard place.

    Like

  2. I hate these puff pieces!!!!

    Everyone knows that stories like this are paid advertisements. God, our journalism in this country also sucks!!!!!!!

    Like

  3. Hell yeah, I’m going to Long Island or If I want to rush I go to Green acres. 1, I have parking, 2. I’m not driving on shitty streets, I hate Jamaica Ave, I like my car too much, 3. Ummmm, I don’t wanna be around sketchy folk. 4. The stores are crap, I can’t stand the carts outside, just makes it look ugly and the store fronts look horrendous…….

    Like

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