WOW, DID SENATOR LEROY COMRIE ACTUALLY SAY SOMETHING INSIGHTFUL AT VIOLENCE RALLY

State Sen. Leroy Comrie (D-St. Albans), never one to shy away from criticism of the NYPD when he feels it appropriate, acknowledged that the homicide problem in the community runs deeper than police-on-civilian confrontations. He said that part of it is up to the community itself to handle.

Sharon Plummer, whose sons, Shawn and NeShawn, were shot to death three years apart in Far Rockaway, the crime scenes less than two blocks apart. Their killings remain unsolved. Plummer wore a T-shirt with the question, “Why my boys?” Carrying that further, Plummer said she long ago lost patience with the code against “snitching” to police. In response to “People in the community know what happened [to my sons],” she said. “If you see something, say something. Death is waiting in everyone’s backyard. Don’t wait until it comes to your front door.”

“You’ve heard of the ‘blue wall of silence,’” Comrie said, alluding to the code ascribed to police officers.“Let’s stop the black wall of silence.”

Wow, an elected official and a black elected official actually calling out African-Americans in their community who have done little to stop the nonsense, damn, I am surprised. It is the first time I am hearing an elected official in this community actually calling out people to be held accountable. Double wow.

On the other hand Senator James Sanders, Jr. said this about the police, I am assuming,  “They say there are only a few bad apples,” But I also know that unless you remove them, a few bad apples can spoil the entire barrel.”

Do you  mean like your crew of crooked and corrupt elected officials. You can also say that about the large amount of low-class human trash that has destroyed so much of this community, but that is not a few bad apples, that is about a dozen carts full and a whole damn orchard.

————————————–

From Queens Chronicle:

Victims’ families on the march in Queens

Crowd seeks answers to unsolved murders, police-community relations

Posted: Thursday, July 14, 2016 10:30 am | Updated: 12:28 pm, Thu Jul 14, 2016.

Kevin Livingston had intended Tuesday’s march through Jamaica and Kew Gardens to bring attention to gun violence, unsolved killings and police-community relations in Southeast Queens.

“I had been planning this for about two months,” said Livingston, a community activist who founded the organization 100 Suits for 100 Men, which links young men, including those who have been in trouble with the law, to educational and employment opportunities.

Then Alton Sterling, a black man, was shot and killed by police in Baton Rouge, La., on July 5. Police are alleging Sterling was reaching for a gun in his waistband. Critics say officers already had Sterling under control.

A day later in Minnesota, Philando Castile, also black, was shot to death in his car during a traffic stop in which he appears to have been trying to cooperate with police.

Then on July 7, a man angry over the killings opened fire at a Black Lives Matter march in Dallas.

The shooter, who subsequently was killed during a standoff with police, killed five police officers and wounded nine more plus two civilians.

He said his goal was to kill white people, particularly white police officers.

While no one on Tuesday could ignore the national events of the last several days, the march turned out pretty much as planned.

Gathering at 165th Street and Jamaica Avenue, those in attendance heard from Sharon Plummer, whose sons, Shawn and NeShawn, were shot to death three years apart in Far Rockaway, the crime scenes less than two blocks apart.

Their killings remain unsolved. Plummer wore a T-shirt with the question, “Why my boys?”

“I’m here because tomorrow is the fourth anniversary of Shawn’s death, and unfortunately, I don’t have any answers.” she said. “Why should I have to be here wearing this on my shirt?”

The group also heard from Anthony Tillman, uncle of George Tillman III, who was shot and killed by NYPD officers in South Ozone Park back in April.

About 70 marchers initially went west along Jamaica Avenue, Parsons Boulevard, Archer Avenue, back to Jamaica and west to Queens Boulevard before wending their way up to the courthouse in Kew Gardens.

A few people were welcomed enthusiastically as they saw the crowd and decided to join in.

Along the way they paused briefly across from the entrance to Maple Grove Cemetery, where Plummer’s sons are buried.

Marchers and other speakers said they know full well that black-on-black crime is far more prevalent than police shootings, though neither did they shy away from calling out Tillman’s name, or those of Eric Garner, Sean Bell and others who have died in confrontations with police.

“They say there are only a few bad apples,” state Sen. James Sanders Jr. (D-South Ozone Park) said. “But I also know that unless you remove them, a few bad apples can spoil the entire barrel.”

Civil rights attorney Kareem Vessup was just the first one to speak of the frustration that much of Southeast Queens feels over the number of unsolved murders in Southeast Queens.

“Every time there is an act of terror, every time a police officer is killed, we hear the politicians and media say that we must bring those responsible to justice,” he said. “Why should it be any different in this neighborhood?”

At the end of the march, Livingston, Plummer and members of Tillman’s family brought a petition with about 2,000 signatures into the office of Queens District Attorney Richard Brown asking him to do what it takes to make solving the backlogged cases a priority.

In the case of Tillman’s shooting, state Attorney General Eric Schneiderman back in June said the case did not meet new standards set that would give him more leeway to investigate officer-involved deaths as a special prosecutor.

The investigation is now being handled by Brown’s office. Tillman’s family members and Attorney Vessup are not satisfied with the delay.

“It’s been two months and 25 days,” Vessup said.

State Sen. Leroy Comrie (D-St. Albans), never one to shy away from criticism of the NYPD when he feels it appropriate, acknowledged that the homicide problem in the community runs deeper than police-on-civilian confrontations.

He said that part of it is up to the community itself to handle.

“When I was growing up there was no one on my block who couldn’t tell me to behave,” he said.

Carrying that further, Plummer said she long ago lost patience with the code against “snitching” to police.

“People in the community know what happened [to my sons],” she said. “If you see something, say something. Death is waiting in everyone’s backyard. Don’t wait until it comes to your front door.”

“You’ve heard of the ‘blue wall of silence,’” Comrie said, alluding to the code ascribed to police officers.

“Let’s stop the black wall of silence.”

But that, one speaker said, also should apply to the NYPD when officers know about a fellow officer who is a racist or has a penchant for brutality or breaking the rules.

 

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