JAMAICA NOW ACTION PLAN, 20 MONTHS LATER AND STILL NOT MUCH TOO SHOW: GARBAGE, HOMELESS SHELTERS, SHITTY RETAIL, HORRIBLE ROADS, ILLEGAL CONVERSIONS & CRAP, CRAP CRAP

For all the hoopla about the big Jamaica Action Now Plan to revitalize Jamaica, now in it’s 20 month, as a resident, there really is not much to show at this point (I know it can take years, at least 15 to really see major improvement), just pretty much the same old Jamaica shit.

In the article below:

Deputy Borough President Melva Miller said that the board anticipates that there will be at least 350-units in the approximately 20-story development. They are hoping to provide energy efficient affordable housing units complete with community rooms and rooftop areas. The construction of the site is said to bring at least 500 temporary and permanent jobs to the area. Bourinaris said that the board is “working very closely with the local elected officials” to make a decision that is beneficial to the community.In addition to this proposed property on 168th, improvements to seven storefronts along Sutphin Blvd have been made with help from New York City Small Business Services, as well as the installation of more than 18 LinkNYC kiosks, which provide free wi-fi and charging stations, have been installed in the neighborhood. Finally, Rufus King Park has seen a number of fixes including new fencing and the installation of water sprinklers for children to enjoy during the summer.

Improving seven storefronts (mostly typical Jamaica crap) along Sutphin Blvd is pretty much peanuts. The 18 LinkNYC kiosks is a big who gives a shit and does not improve quality of life. But I will say that the improvement to Rufus King Park has been a big winner (it should, over a million dollars was spent) and while the park is much cleaner than it was before, the area near the soccer field still gets much garbage by the slob residents. Now all this huge apartment buildings in the works, how the hell is the infrastructure going to handle this (sewage, traffic, parking, subway, etc). I mean Jamaica is already very crowded, especially from the tearing down of many 1-2 family  homes to be replaced by cheap crappy third world multi-family dwellings run by slumlords and filled with too many slob folks and the parking situation is bad. But why worry about a little thing like infrastructure.

But 20 months in, Jamaica still has a big garbage problem. Hillside Avenue is filthy and the majority of storefronts look like shit. Jamaica Avenue still continues to have crap retail that most people of quality would not go to, plus it is filthy. Jamaica Colosseum Mall and 165th Street are ONE BIG GHETTO MESS. With the exception of a few stores, it is all ghetto crap. The surrounding streets are in horrible condition, not just for cars, but bikes and pedestrians. The shitty city agency DOT said that many streets like Parson Blvd would be taken care of by June 2016, well it is December and DOT has not done a damn thing. Illegal conversions are still a big problem. Large tractor trailer trucks and privates waste trucks still continue to use residential streets causing noise and safety issues. Tractor trailer trucks are still parking illegally all over the community. The thug auto body shops due to practically no enforcement by NYPD have littered Merrick Blvd and many of the side streets and sidewalks with junked and unlicensed vehicles. LIRR Station on Sutphin and the surrounding area is still garbage filled, horrible traffic and ghetto trash hanging out all over. And let’s not forget the numerous homeless shelters that to this day still continue to get dumped into this area. And if so much  money is being spent on downtown Jamaica, why oh why is that poisonous waste facility, Royal Waste, still right near the downtown section, which has trucks going in and out for all of NYC 24/7. Or how about that awful bus terminal on Merrick Blvd and 89th Ave across from the Central Library which has so much noise plus all the pollution and traffic from all of these buses.

So 20 months later, as I said, not much too brag about at all. To me it seems pretty much like the same old shit. Though I don’t see as much illegal garbage dumping in the downtown area as I had seen in the past, the area still has a litter problem, thanks to low-class ghetto slobs.  And I won’t even get into the crime, shootings and killings, especially in South Jamaica.

So 20 months later……………………….Rufus King and Crap6.11.16 051

ILLEGAL. Blocking of sidewalks

ILLEGAL. Blocking of sidewalks

trucks11-24-16-003trucks11-24-16-002

Huge pile of cement has been like this for over five years.

Huge pile of cement has been like this for over five years.

Teddy and Trash7.17.16 018garbage and trucks7.1.16 010garbage and trucks7.1.16 005garbage 6.25.16 010garbage 6.25.16 003garbage 6.25.16 009Trucks6.19.16 011Trucks6.19.16 008garbage6.19.16 004garbage6.19.16 001

CITY PROPERTY

CITY PROPERTY

Garbage & Cars6.18.16 038Garbage & Cars6.18.16 111Garbage & Cars6.18.16 075garbage6.15.16 020

———————-

From Queens Press:

Jamaica Now, 20 Months Later

BY TRONE DOWD

Members of the Greater Jamaica Development Corporation board gathered in the Harvest Room Wednesday afternoon for an update on the ambitious Jamaica Now Action, first introduced in June 2015.

Melinda Katz stopped by November’s Greater Jamaica Development Corporation meeting to share her confidence in the Jamaica Now plan.

Melinda Katz stopped by November’s Greater Jamaica Development Corporation meeting to share her confidence in the Jamaica Now plan.

Facilitated by deputy borough president Melva Miller, the meeting marked a year and a half into the proposal.

“We feel that this is a good time to talk about some of the key projects, where they are and what we have to look forward to,” Miller said.

A board assembled by the Borough President’s office to facilitate the plan gave the details on the plan’s progress and its many initiatives that are a part of Jamaica Now. On that board is member of the economic development team with the Borough President’s office Shurn Anderson, Jamaica Queens native and co-chair of the Jamaica Now leadership council Ian Harris, fellow co-chair and director at the Regional Planning Association Pierina Ana Sanchez, Stephen Everett with the Queens office of City Planning, Queens director for the New York City Economic Development Corporation Eleni Bourinaris, and finally, Rebecca Blatt who works under Deputy Mayor Alicia Glen at City Hall.

First up was an update on some of the key projects that were a part of the plan. Among those projects is the mixed-income housing planned for the vacant 168th Street garage formerly owned by the New York City Police Department. According to the panel, the community vocalized a concern over using this property for something that could benefit locals.

“We are very close to selecting a developer and we hope to announce something in the coming month,” Bourinaris said.

She said that the board anticipates that there will be at least 350-units in the approximately 20-story development. They are hoping to provide energy efficient affordable housing units complete with community rooms and rooftop areas. The construction of the site is said to bring at least 500 temporary and permanent jobs to the area. Bourinaris said that the board is “working very closely with the local elected officials” to make a decision that is beneficial to the community.

In addition to this proposed property on 168th, improvements to seven storefronts along Sutphin Blvd have been made with help from New York City Small Business Services, as well as the installation of more than 18 LinkNYC kiosks, which provide free wi-fi and charging stations, have been installed in the neighborhood. Finally, Rufus King Park has seen a number of fixes including new fencing and the installation of water sprinklers for children to enjoy during the summer.

In August, Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced that Jamaica was the recipient of a statewide grant to help push development in SOutheast Queens further. GJDC received $10 million in grant money to put towards additional capital improvements.

Next was transit. Shortly after the Jamaica Now plan was announced, the NYC Department of Transportation became heavily involved with identifying troubled transit areas in the neighborhoods. Blatt announced that the DOT study to identify streetscape improvements was well underway with help of feedback from the community collected last year.

“DOT reached 450 people by survey and launched a street ambassador program set to resume in December, as well as meeting with the Community Board 12 Transportation Committee on December 13,” she said.

Everett wrapped up the update with the progress on the controversial hotel development plans for Southeast Queens. Due to the city’s investment in Jamaica, he pointed out that their has been a spur of interest from private companies wanting to bring housing, retail and hotels to the area.

“On the horizon are approximately 3,000 to 3,500 new housing units, over 200,000 square feet of retail space and over 2000 hotel units are expected to come to the area in the next five years,” Everett detailed.

Borough President Melinda Katz, one of the main flag bearers of the initiative to make Jamaica a center for commerce and urban development for tourists and potential residents alike, stopped by to give her remarks on the progress of the plan.

“Folks do want to come here, live here and play here,” Katz said. “Working on Jamaica Now, we want to make sure that the rest of the city sees what we saw. With over $150 million in investments from the city and over $10 million in investments from the state, I think that we have arrived.”

 

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One thought on “JAMAICA NOW ACTION PLAN, 20 MONTHS LATER AND STILL NOT MUCH TOO SHOW: GARBAGE, HOMELESS SHELTERS, SHITTY RETAIL, HORRIBLE ROADS, ILLEGAL CONVERSIONS & CRAP, CRAP CRAP

  1. Add to this the noticeable – witnessed – uptick in petit burglary of cars along Homelawn St (eastern border of Jamaica Estates) north to Grand Central Pkwy (where it becomes Utopia Parkway): no less than ~ 6 piles of broken glass seen next to cars, an interview with a cabbie 1 block north of Hillside who was cleaning out his cab, in the last ~ 2 months.
    Earlier this week a Bangla cabdriver, finishing his late-night shift at ~ 4 AM, was mugged by two thugs similar to the ones shown a few days ago in your post of the Jamaica Center incident. No police seen after the 911 call.
    They were pros: the guy was small, there were two of them, one kept his hand over the victim’s mouth so he could’nt call for help while they other took everything he had.
    (Any reaason this incident – a violent felony – wasn’t reported in Comrie’s crack ‘neighborhood’ press?)
    Many of the cabbies who live in the apts closer to Hillside park where they can, further north: quiet residential, no one awake late night, plenty of places to hide, perfect easy pickings.
    It’s the Christmas Season after all: need new shoes, new iPhones, gotta get paid. School and work? That’s for assholes.
    If the cancer isnt’ crushed where it originates, the disease just continues to spread: and our SE Queens ‘representatives’ continue to hold ‘community forums’ on ‘police brutality’, sending out flyers for free turkeys, free toys, free this, free that. ‘Bread and Circuses’: keep it coming.

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