SHITTY DOT GETS BLASTED AT PRESENTATION OF BULLSHIT DOWNTOWN JAMAICA TRANSPORTATION STUDY

You heard my take on this bullshit presentation (https://cleanupjamaicaqueens.wordpress.com/2017/03/21/downtown-jamaica-transportation-study-public-meeting-a-big-fucking-crap-of-nothing/), so let’s hear one of the local media, Queens Chronicle’s take.

Kudos to Councilman I. Daneek Miller (one of the better local elected officials) for this line, which sums up much:

“They’re spending money on ferry ramps in some neighborhoods, and $3 billion on streetcars for communities that don’t exist yet,” Miller said. “But our transportation system here is 50 years old.”

YES, that says it all about places like Jamaica and this administration under de Blasio, he of the “Tale of Two Cities” and making that tale grow even WIDER.

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From Queens Chronicle:

DOT gets an earful on Jamaica traffic

Residents unimpressed at halfway point of major transportation study

Posted: Thursday, March 23, 2017 10:30 am | Updated: 1:00 pm, Thu Mar 23, 2017.

One of the stated purposes of Monday night’s presentation on the Downtown Jamaica Transportation Study was for the city’s Department of Transportation representatives to obtain feedback from the public at the project’s halfway point.

Mission accomplished, as Jamaica residents and members of Community Board 12 repeatedly called the 25-page update insufficient, lacking in several key areas regarding traffic congestion and safety.

Michael Griffith and project manager Carren Simpson made their presentation before more than 40 people in the Harvest Room on 160th Street. Begun formally in fall 2015, the study’s primary area is bordered by Hillside Avenue to the north, 183rd Street to the east, Liberty Avenue to the south and the Van Wyck Expressway to the west.

A secondary area goes from Linden Boulevard to Union Turnpike and from 130th Street to 193rd Street-Farmers Boulevard.

“And for things like buses we take into account those coming from Nassau County,” Griffith said.

The study to this point has included feedback from several public meetings, footage from time-lapse cameras at major intersections, police and DOT accident statistics and engineering studies, among others.

Among the things Griffith said the DOT was seeking input about on Monday were proposals such as adding crosswalks on Hillside Avenue; adding signs and retiming traffic lights at various places; dealing with narrow streets; on- and off-street parking availability; reclassifying some one-way streets and redesigning some intersections.

And while the presentation included mention of studies of things like truck traffic, dollar vans and poor bus service, residents remained largely unimpressed. Vanessa Sparks was one of those who said the report is lacking.

She took issue, for example, with the contention that peak afternoon rush hour is between 4:45 and 5:45 p.m. Griffith did say that is only the peak hour of a peak period that extends for about four hours.

“And there’s no mention of the [Metropolitan Transportation Authority],” Sparks said. “How can you get anything done without the MTA at the table?”

One proposal to relieve a lack of direct north-south routes between Jamaica and Hillside avenues is converting 150th Street from its current one-way southbound designation to a two-way street between the two major thoroughfares.

But Michele Keller, the transportation committee chairwoman at CB 12, said the narrow street already gets backed up.

“There is a school on 150th, and you’re going to make it two-way?” she asked, referring to PS 182, the Samantha Smith School, which sits across 150th Street from Rufus King Park.

Resident Joe Moretti found the existing recommendations totally inadequate for dealing with truck traffic, both legal and otherwise.

“I’ve been fighting this for years,” he said. “This doesn’t account for trucks in my neighborhood. Why does the DOT still allow truck routes on Merrick Boulevard and 168th Street? It is truly beyond comprehension.”

“And without enforcement, nothing is going to change,” CB 12 Chairwoman Adrienne Adams said, referring largely to truck, parking and dollar van problems.

Several people alluded to or stated directly that the plan thus far seems to be just another Manhattan-based solution to be imposed from afar.

“You don’t come into my house and tell me what I need,” she said. “I tell you.”

Sparks called the combined actions and lack of action over the years “transportation apartheid,” saying what may be needed is Jamaica residents coming out “with pitchforks and lanterns.”

Councilman Daneek Miller (D-St. Albans) concurred, saying that people need to keep turning out with the numbers and passion of Monday night.

“If you don’t, it’s all going to be bike lanes,” Miller said.

“We hear the same thing year after year after year after year,” Adams said.

She and Miller also faulted the MTA, and the city and state governments.

“They’re spending money on ferry ramps in some neighborhoods, and $3 billion on streetcars for communities that don’t exist yet,” Miller said. “But our transportation system here is 50 years old.”

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