LONGTIME JAMAICA QUEENS ACTIVIST, ASIM DEEN, WILL ENTER THE MAYORAL RACE

Hey, Asim, we certainly could use some new blood that cares about the community in the local scene of politics, I mean look at some of the crap that is here in Jamaica now: Comrie, Cooks, Wills.

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From Jean-Andre Sassine :

Longtime community activist Asim Deen of Jamaica Queens will be entering the mayoral race to bring community back to city government!  He will hold a press conference at the corner commercial plaza of Francis Lewis Blvd and Jamaica Ave. at 11 am tomorrow morning (3.30.17).  The same corner last year from which he called attention  to the delay of DOT’s repaving of South East Queens and called local elected to task.
More at:

NYCC Protests Condition Of Jamaica Avenue

BY TRONE DOWD

Editor

Members of New York Communities for Change stood out at the corner of Francis Lewis Boulevard and Jamaica Avenue Saturday morning to protest the city’s repeated broken promises pertaining to torn-up roadways in the neighborhood.

Members of NYCC protest Saturday about the condition of area roads.

The Southeast Queens Chapter of NYCC announced last week that it collected over 400 signatures from the community, calling for action to fix the bumpy and destructive intersection of Jamaica Avenue and Francis Lewis. The chapter has been particularly active as of late. Back in August, the civic group protested a proposed 14-story building in downtown Jamaica.

Among those who attended were Republican candidate for the 24th Assembly District Ira Harris and Republican candidate for the 5th Congressional District Michael O’Reilly. Both of them are residents as well as supporters of the NYCC.

“This is not my assembly district,” Harris told the Queens Tribune. “But I’ve traveled this road frequently.”

Harris said that in his experience, he has seen the damage that the torn-up street has caused to the cars of constituents.

“This road has never gotten paved,” Harris said. “I always wondered why other roads get paved twice in two years while this road did not. As Mike O’Reilly said, these votes are usually guaranteed. I couldn’t understand why the people of this community would vote time and time again to re-elect officials that wouldn’t address their issues.”

The condition of northern Jamaica Avenue has been a long-time concern of residents and commuters alike for decades. Last year, during the race for the District 27 City Council, fixing Jamaica Avenue was one of the chief concerns of the candidates. In fact, the Queens Tribune took a tour of the streets with then city council candidate Ali Najmi last August. Many local businesses talked about how the torn-up streets have affected commerce in the area. They complained that their shops are often ignored since they are located in a spot drivers avoid at all costs.

Countless accidents have occurred along this roadway. In September alone, 10 accidents occurred at the corner of Francis Lewis Boulevard and Jamaica Avenue, according to Motor Vehicle collision data reports.

“We need to listen to the people, because they usually know what the solutions are to the problem better than Albany does and better than the city council,” Harris said.

The Department of Transportation has taken note of the issue in recent months. During a town hall last month when the issue was raised with Mayor Bill de Blasio, he brought up Borough Commissioner Nicole Garcia, who personally said that she had been working with Councilman I. Daneek Miller (D-St. Albans) and that the issue was being addressed.

As of last month, it was reported that the DOT would be repaving seven miles of road from Francis Lewis Boulevard to 225th Street as early as December. In the months to follow, the DOT will then repave 168th Street to Francis Lewis Boulevard.

NYCC, however, was not convinced they’d actually see the changes announced last month.

“I’ve been living here for the last 26 years,” Asim Deem, a member of NYCC, told the Queens Tribune. “This roadway has never been done. What they keep doing was just dumping some asphalt in certain parts of the roadway. That’s been going on for decades. There comes a time when you tell yourself enough is enough. Drivers have been paying hundreds of dollars for repairs of their vehicle because of this.”

He wondered when residents would see the completion of fixes that have been promised over the years.

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