JAMAICA’S STATE OF EMERGENCY FOR QUALITY OF LIFE – THE PERFECT SYMBOL

Nothing screams outs out what a fucked up disaster the community of Jamaica is than this wonderful symbol.

GOING……..

GOING…………….

FUCKING GONE……………

 

And speaking of symbols. How perfect. Grab some ghetto grub at either KFC or White Castle and when you are done grab a quick nap in some fresh air, Jamaica style. For the record, despite several 311 complaints, the mattress has been there a week before the snowstorm. I understand DOS not finding it after the storm which is was covered by about 12 inches of snow, but it was there a whole week before the snow and now it is coming out of hibernation. I guess this is all part of the Jamaica Now Action Plan or as asshole BP Melinda Katz loves to say, “If it’s good for Queens, it’s good for families”.

GJDC, COUNCILMAN LANCMAN & JAMAICA HILLS PARTNERSHIP ARE PLANNING A COMMUNITY FESTIVAL EVENT IN MAY – MAYBE THEY CALL IT “CLEAN THE FUCKING FILTHY DISGUSTING THIRD WORLD CRAP CALLED HILLSIDE AVENUE” CAUSED BY THE SLOB RESIDENTS AND BUSINESSES THERE

Hillside Avenue as it looks today

REALLY, a community festival. Only if it entails people carrying brooms, mops, hoses and garbage bags to clean up the FILTHIEST DISGUSTING stretch any where in NYC.

THIRD WORLD BANGLADESHI AVENUE (formerly known as Hillside Avenue. Shove your diversity up your ASS.

Right outside shitty Yummy at corner of Hillside Ave/168th. Typical of the Hillside Ave but perfect for the low class ghetto and low class third world folks.

 

THE MODA “LUXURY” APARTMENT BUILDING GARBAGE DUMP UPDATE

From Leland Vall:

Hello to Everyone on the Moda Dump Photo List!
Sanitation came today, but not so much for Moda. The attached photos show that while 90th Ave. is completely clear of bagged and bulk trash, the Moda garden is still filled with the mattress, pile of wood, TV (TVs are not allowed in the waste stream) and the other junk that was there yesterday. Is it possible that Moda doesn’t know how to properly prepare it’s trash so that Sanitation will take it?  And once again, there is already more bagged trash (next trash day is Wednesday afternoon).  Storing bagged trash outside invites more dumping and probably feeds the rats.
Thanks for looking and stay tuned for tomorrow’s Moda Dump photos. Maybe it will look nicer covered with snow.
Best,
Leland Vall

 

FROM THE GREAT SMELLING JAMAICA WONDER BREAD FACTORY TO THE POISONOUS STENCH OF REGAL RECYCLING (1991) & ROYAL WASTE (2011) AND ALL THE ELECTED OFFICIAL INVOLVED AT THE TIME OF THIS DUMPING OF POISON INTO THE COMMUNITY

Royal Waste comprises the entire blue rectangle. As can be seen thousands of homes and a park are at risk.

Royal Waste comprises the entire blue rectangle. As can be seen thousands of homes and a park are at risk.

Royal Waste Service, the biggest culprits

Royal Waste Service, the biggest culprits

Finally I have found out some information that I have been trying to get for some time now and that is when the poisonous, polluting, toxic and irresponsible neighbors in Jamaica, both Regal Recycling &  Royal Waste Services came into existence in Jamaica at Douglas Avenue and who were the elected officials at that time. Well, after some digging, I now have some answers but not all of them

Before the polluting and irresponsible Royal Waste came to be at Douglas Ave and 168th St, there was the Wonder Bread Factory (for 130 years), which closed in January of 2011. Yet even then, a few blocks east sat the also poisonous foul smelling recycling waste station, Regal Recycling Company at 172-06 Douglas Avenue, which I am not sure when that place was dumped into Jamaica, but in 2009, three men were killed horribly in a toxic pit and they were given a permit to manage solid waste back in 1991. Regal has had many major violations during it’s history and is still in operation in Jamaica.  Royal Waste obviously then was dumped not too long after the closing of the Wonder Bread Factory in 2011.

So during this time line what elected officials were in office, who obviously gave the go ahead for these places and from my calculations since I am not quite sure of when Regal Recycling actually started (1991?):

  1. Mayor David Dinkins followed by Rudy Gulliani followed by Michael Bloomberg
  2. Queens Borough President Claire Schulman  followed by Helen Marshall
  3. Councilman Archie Spigner  followed by Leroy Comrie
  4. Senator Dean Skelos followed by Senator Malcolm Smith , both are in prison on corruption charges
  5. Congressman Floyd Flake followed by Gregory Meeks
  6. Assembly Member William Scarborough , in prison

So these are the folks who were all in office during the time line of these poisonous waste stations dumped in Jamaica. Seems like the same crew responsible for so much bullshit and misery in this community and yet a couple of them are still in office and still NOT looking out for the community, while some of the others like Flake & Spigner are still pulling strings. So if fingers need to be pointed, this is the crew to point them at.

For you history buffs and others here are some interesting articles on the subject that I found. AND you find out just what BAD Neighbors these companies actually are not the good neighbors that Royal Vice President Mike Reaki claims.

Royal Waste Disaster at the 170th Street/Douglas location where 3 workers were killed by toxic chemicals in 2009

Royal Waste Disaster at the 170th Street/Douglas location where 3 workers were killed by toxic chemicals in 2009

———————–

From New York Times:

3 Men Die in Toxic Well in Queens

Theodore Parisienne for The New York Times

A relative of one of the dead men was initially kept out of the treatment plant by police officers.

Published: June 29, 2009

Three workers at a waste transfer station in Queens were overcome by toxic fumes Monday afternoon and died, apparently falling one after another into the Stygian gloom of a putrid, manhole-size, 18-foot-deep well they were trying to vacuum, fire officials said.

The New York Times

The accidents occurred at a waste transfer station in Jamaica, Queens.

Ethan Wilensky-Lanford

Rene F. Rivas, 52, a native of El Salvador, apparently fell trying to rescue the others.

A rope and ladder dangling into the hole, which was filled with deadly concentrations of hydrogen sulfide gas, and the accounts of witnesses at the scene suggested to the authorities that one victim had fallen first to his death and that the other two had followed in successive, futile rescue efforts.Firefighters found the bodies — including those of a father and son — floating face down in four feet of murky water at the bottom of the hole at the Regal Recycling Company at 172-06 Douglas Avenue in Jamaica, an ugly street of waste plants, garbage scows and sheds enclosed by chain-link fences and topped by fluttering American flags.

“I don’t know if they knew the exact danger,” John Sudnik, deputy assistant fire chief of the Queens Borough Command, told reporters at the scene. “In that type of atmosphere, it’s very toxic.”

The police identified the victims as Shlomo Dahan, 49, of Flushing, Queens, the owner of the S. Dahan Piping and Heating Corporation, the South Ozone Park contractor hired to clean the well; his son Harel Dahan, 23, of East 73rd Street in Brooklyn; and Rene Francisco Rivas, 52, of Jamaica Avenue in Queens, a native of El Salvador who was an employee of Regal Recycling.

The bodies were raised to the surface by firefighters using a hoist and ropes and harnesses that were carried into the well by Firefighter Robert Lagnese, 33, of Rescue Squad 270, a six-year fire veteran trained to work in confined spaces. He wore protective clothing and an enclosed breathing apparatus, and though he suffered no apparent ill effects, he was taken to Jamaica Hospital Medical Center for observation.

Chief Sudnik said the concentration of hydrogen sulfide in the hole was measured at 200 parts per million, double the amount that environmental experts consider “imminently dangerous.” He said an exposure to 50 parts per million could be lethal within 10 minutes, suggesting that concentrations four times that amount would be deadly in a much shorter time.

While the source of the hydrogen sulfide in the hole was unknown, the chief called the gas a common byproduct of the decomposition of organic matter. Employees at Regal said the hole was a catch basin for runoff water that was probably laced with chemical debris from the recycling yard, where trucks deliver garbage and other materials, much of it from construction sites.

Behind the hole is a 40-foot multistory shed, with bays where the trucks pull up with materials to be sorted for recycling. Signs indicate the types: “Putrescible” and “Non-Putrescible,” separating solid wastes from those that are likely to become rotten. Another sign at the gate says: “No drums, asbestos, hazardous materials, medical waste or tires.”

The industrial neighborhood, which stands on the south side of Douglas Avenue opposite the Long Island Rail Road tracks, is crowded with waste collection companies and adrift in odors that suggest rotting food and oil. The avenue is littered with oil stains, broken glass and dirty piles of something resembling eggplant.

Mr. Dahan and his son, who arrived at the well in a truck equipped with suction equipment to vacuum it out, were joined by Mr. Rivas. Reconstructing what happened from witness accounts and other evidence at the scene, Chief Sudnik said that Harel Dahan apparently went first into the hole, which is about 3 feet in diameter, descending a ladder affixed to a rope shortly after 2 p.m.

It was unclear how far down he went before being overcome by the toxic fumes, and it was unclear if he was killed by the fumes or drowned in the water at the bottom, officials said. In any case, when he did not return, his father went down after him. He, too, was overcome and fell into the water below. Mr. Rivas, in turn, went down, apparently in an attempt to rescue the others, and was overcome and fell to the bottom.

Oscar Rivas, 27, Mr. Rivas’s son, said firefighters told him that his father had been the third to die, in an attempt to save the others. “They told me it was an accident, that he saw two men fall into the hole, and he jumped in to try and help them,” Mr. Rivas said. “He was always like that, always helping people. He was a good person.”

Witnesses were heard screaming, and a call was made to 911 at 2:32 p.m., fire officials said. The first trucks arrived at 2:39 p.m., but apparently it was already too late.

But firefighters called Consolidated Edison and asked for assistance in a rescue operation. Con Edison sent two vacuum trucks to help clear debris, but while they were en route the request for assistance was canceled. D. Joy Faber, a utility spokeswoman who talked to a Con Edison worker at the scene, said “it was discovered that there were three victims that had expired.”

The task of recovering the bodies, with a device called a high-point anchor rescue system — a rig that holds hoisting ropes steady over a hole — took about 20 minutes, Chief Sudnik said.

As a crowd of people gathered at the gates, Abe Rosenthal, who identified himself as a longtime friend of Shlomo Dahan, said the contractor had been born in Israel and owned his own company, which cleaned storm drains. It was unclear how much experience the Dahans had in dealing with highly toxic material, and it was unknown if they had been warned of the dangers.

Mr. Rosenthal speculated that “they had no idea that there was gas.”

“He was a very sweet guy,” Mr. Rosenthal said of the elder Mr. Dahan. He said Mr. Dahan was married and the father of three sons and a daughter. “I can’t believe that it happened,” he said.

Peter Ferrier, 49, a neighbor of Rene Rivas, said Mr. Rivas lived with his wife, a son and another family, and recalled that he had seen him going to work on Monday, clad in jeans and a T-shirt and carrying his customary black and red backpack.

“I saw him with his bag,” Mr. Ferrier said. “He was taking off, and he said, ‘What’s up, Papi?’ Mr. Ferrier said he rarely saw Mr. Rivas because he was always working. “This man always works, every day he goes to work.”

Efforts to reach officials of the company were not immediately successful. Calls to Regal Recycling and to Royal Waste Services, an adjacent plant at 172-08 Douglas Avenue that is believed to be affiliated with Regal, were answered by people who declined to speak. Regal is owned by Michael Reali.

According to state records, the commercial plant is run by M. & P. Reali Enterprises, doing business as the Regal Recycling Company. A man who answered the phone at the plant said the company had no immediate comment.

The Web site of the State Department of Environmental Conservation describes the plant as a solid waste transfer station and recyclables handling and recovery plant, which is authorized to handle putrescible waste, as well as construction and demolition debris.

From 2000 to 2002, according to government records, the plant petitioned the Department of Environmental Conservation and the city’s Department of Sanitation for permission to increase its capacity for the management of putrescible solid waste more than threefold, to 1,200 cubic yards (600 tons) per day from 355 cubic yards (177.5 tons) per day.

The proposal, which the two agencies found would not have a negative effect on the environment, called for maintaining the plant’s capacity for handling construction and demolition debris but decreased the permitted on-site storage capacity for such debris.

According to the Environmental Conservation Department, the company has had a permit to manage solid waste since 1991. Its current permit allows for a daily capacity of 600 tons per day of solid waste and 266 tons per day of construction and demolition debris. The department intends to send staff members to inspect the plant, said a department spokeswoman, Maureen Wren.

In 2006, the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration fined the plant $1,500 after a worker was crushed to death by a Caterpillar wheel-loader the previous year, according to federal records. The Daily News reported that the worker, Effraine Calderone, 46, an immigrant from El Salvador, had been leaning against the wheel of the massive tractor when the driver put the machine in gear and rolled over him.

Records from the most recent OSHA inspection, conducted earlier this year, show that the federal agency identified several serious violations at the plant, including violations concerning floor and wall openings and holes, industrial stairs, respiratory protection, medical services, and oxygen-fuel gas welding and cutting. The company was directed to pay thousands of dollars in penalties in connection with those violations.

From The Daily News:

End of an era as Wonder Bread plant in Jamaica, Queens ready to shut off the ovens

capture

Wonder Bread’s parent company, Hostess, is closing down the Jamaica, Queens plant.

(Harbus for News)

A Wonder Bread plant in Queens will bake its last loaves Thursday, ending a 130-year run in Jamaica while hundreds of employees scramble for jobs or settle for lesser-paying gigs.

Wonder Bread’s parent company, Hostess, is laying off 175 workers and reassigning 15 from the Douglas Ave. facility, corporation officials said.

Bitter bakers fretted about their fates after attending a job fair at the plant Wednesday.

Employees said they earn between $40,000 and $70,000, while job fair recruiters – including Bartlett Dairy and Elmhurst Dairy – offered annual salaries of $30,000 or less.

“It’s an insult,” said Edwin Ramos, 46, a factory painter who has worked for Wonder Bread for 25 years. “It’s a joke, a big joke.”

Another employee griped that unemployment benefits would pay more than the jobs being advertised at the fair, such as bus drivers and guards at JFK and LaGuardia airports.

But City Councilman Leroy Comrie (D-St. Albans), who helped organize the fair with the city Workforce1 Career Center,described the event as “well organized.” He stressed that jobs may start with low salaries and go up.

“There may be a better opportunity than they realize,” he said.

Opened in the 1870s as the Shults Bread Co., the bakery began producing Wonder Bread in the 1920s. Nostalgic locals recalled factory tours with free samples of sweet bread.

But Hostess announced last year that modernizing the bakery would be too costly and difficult.

The decision to close the facility left employees surprised and angry.

Ramos said he accepted a job at the Hostess garage across the street that pays $2.25 less per hour than his painting gig.

“For the last three months, they’ve had a noose around our necks and are choking us a little more each day,” said truck driver Gary Roberts, 59.

Another employee jokingly asked a reporter Wednesday, “You don’t have jobs for us?”

Hostess plans to sell the site. “For Sale” signs from CB Richard Ellis, one of the world’s largest commercial real estate firms, are posted on both the bakery and the garage.

The adjacent outlet store, where shoppers are greeted by ads with Captain Cupcake and Twinkie the Kid, will remain open and relocate elsewhere in Queens when the factory is sold, company officials said.

BAD ROYAL WASTE: JAMAICA’S OWN VERSION OF FLINT MICHIGAN – BAD NEIGHBOR ROYAL WASTE SMACK IN THE MIDDLE OF RESIDENTIAL AREA SLOWLY POISONING THIS COMMUNITY AND HAS BEEN ALLOWED TO CONTINUE FOR YEARS – TIME TO TOSS THIS NEIGHBOR OUT FOR GOOD

Royal Waste Disaster at the 170th Street/Douglas location where 3 workers were killed by toxic chemicals in 2009

Royal Waste Disaster at the 170th Street/Douglas location where 3 workers were killed by toxic chemicals in 2009

Royal Waste

Royal Waste

This story is worth reporting again, because knowing how things go, it will be pushed back to the shadows and forgotten about.  Royal Waste has been slowly poisoning nearby residents since they were given a go-ahead (BY WHO???) years ago to be placed smack in the middle of a residential area, near hundreds of homes with children and elderly, a NYCHA Senior Citizen Apartment building and Detective Kieth Williams Park, where familes, children and young play.CAN you imagine this to be allowed in FOREST HILLS, yet I have NOT heard one word from Queens BP Melinda Katz or her predecessor Helen Marshal and not one word from the long time elected officials, Leroy Comrie, who was around when this was given the go-ahead. SPEAK COMRIE, SPEAK. AND where are you media folks from THE DAILY NEWS or what about you COLOR OF COMMUNITY, this should be the top story on your front page.

Royal Waste with it’s awful stench, which I have smelled riding my bike near all the homes by it on 93rd this past summer, all the noise with 24/7 trucks and all the toxins and pollutants being put in the air and in the ground. This place should have never been placed in such close proximity to residents. It belongs in an industrial area from from residents. SHAME on those elected officials who signed off on this over a decade ago. WHO ARE YOU?

Kudos though to Councilman Miller for helping to shine a spotlight on this Jamaica version of Flint Michigan. ENVIRONMENTAL RACISM.

Polluting solid waste company, Royal Waste, dumped into a residential area, a few blocks from Downtown, thanks to elected officials.

Polluting solid waste company, Royal Waste, dumped into a residential area, a few blocks from Downtown, thanks to elected officials.

Royal Waste comprises the entire blue rectangle. As can be seen thousands of homes and a park are at risk.

Royal Waste comprises the entire blue rectangle. As can be seen thousands of homes and a park are at risk.

————————————-

From Queens Press:

Stop The Stench In Jamaica

Something stinks in Jamaica—literally.

Residents living near Liberty Avenue have long been complaining that a garbage processing plant operated by Royal Waste Services Inc. has damaged their quality of life.

The plant, which is located on 168-56 Douglas Ave., and two other plants in the Bronx and Brooklyn process three-quarters of the city’s trash. Homeowners near the site have said that the plant produces unbearable smells, its trucks are loud and tear up streets in the community and air pollution from the site is in close proximity to a heavily utilized park.

Neighbors of the plant have called on Royal Waste to be a better neighbor and we agree with them. There’s no good reason why residents should be forced to keep their windows shut during the summer, when the smells from the plant worsen, or be chased away from a local park due to bad odors.

Mayor Bill de Blasio has said that he wants to transition waste disposal to a more manageable “zoned system” in which neighborhoods would only handle their own trash. A good place to start would be Jamaica, where one Liberty Avenue resident told the Press of Southeast Queens that the smell from Royal Waste often keeps her awake at night.

Obviously, a city as large as New York City will produce a significant amount of garbage and that trash must be processed somewhere. But a single community should not be bearing the brunt of it. If Royal Waste continues to process garbage in Southeast Queens, it should find a way to curb the stench plaguing its neighbors. If not, then the city needs to move forward with a plan to evenly dispose of trash throughout the five boroughs, instead of polluting communities of color.

 

From Queens Chronicle:

March seeks worker, environmental rights

Douglas Avenue in Jamaica hosts a number of trash-related operations

 

Posted: Thursday, March 2, 2017 10:30 am

Jamaica Industrial Park’s evolving landscape of waste transfer stations along Douglas Avenue in Jamaica is frustrating local residents and safety workers through its daily sanitation routine.

In the past, “if you came within a mile of this place here, all you would smell is Wonder Bread, because this was the Wonder Bread factory, but now, all you smell is garbage,” Councilman Daneek Miller (D-St. Albans) told a group on Liberty Avenue last Saturday.

Miller and about 40 people upset with the operations first gathered near Det. Keith L. Williams Park, which often is downwind from the numerous trash haulers and transfer stations one block north on both sides of Douglas Avenue. Miller said it is an ongoing fight for the workers at and the residents around the trash operations.

“It’s an issue of waste transfer equity,” said Miller, who is a co-sponsor of Intro 495-A, a bill to reduce permitted capacity at waste transfer stations in overburdened districts.

The issue of noxious odors, high-volume truck traffic, damaged roads and waste transfer stations are depleting the quality of life for residents including many young children.

“There is no reason why three of four communities in the City of New York are responsible for 75 percent of the garbage,” said Miller.

“Southeast will continue to do its fair share to make this city better, but we will not do more than our fair share,” said Miller. “This is a community of home ownership and the two cannot mutually exist to the point where it continues to grow.”

Miller’s talk was followed with a prayer led by the Rev. Andrew Wilkes of the Greater Allen AME Cathedral of New York.

Wilkes emphasized environmental, ecological and workers’ safety just a few hundred yards from Royal Waste, which is in close proximity to residential homes and the site of truck-damaged streets. Part of the group eventually marched to and gathered on Douglas near the company’s premises.

Royal officials could not be reached for comment.

The street damage from high truck traffic has left Douglas Avenue plagued with leachate — contaminated water that has passed through matter or suspended solids. That has caused Douglas Avenue to reek with a foul odor.

Carl Orlando, a worker with Safety Group, a construction safety company, said that Douglas Avenue used to be a “normal street,” but that changed due to high truck traffic.

“I worked for seven different companies in the last four years and I’ve never been paid overtime, and the trucks are not safe,” Orlando said.

Miller said workers in the industry, many of them immigrants, tell him and his staff of serious job-related injuries that they suffer. In 2009, three workers from a sewage company hired by Royal were killed when they were overcome by fumes while clearing a drain.

“I do appreciate them speaking about reducing truck traffic, but I want to see mandatory safety training,” Orlando said.

Adjacent to Royal, Richard Brown, an auto body shop manager, said he also wishes the streets would be fixed.

“I don’t know about the dump — but I know the road is terrible,” Brown said.

“I park my personal car around six blocks [over]; I never bring my personal car on this block,” he added.

From Queens Press:

Jamaica Residents Protest Foul-Smelling Waste Plant

ROYAL-PAIN

BY TRONE DOWD

The stench coming from a garbage processing plant controlled by Royal Waste has all but destroyed the quality of life for some residents along Liberty Avenue in Jamaica, inciting action from upset elected officials, the New York City Environmental Justice Alliance and congregants of the Greater Allen A.M.E. Cathedral.

Members of the Greater Allen A.M.E. Cathedral Church in Jamaica joined city environmentalists to conduct a tour of the Royal Waste Service’s processing plant. Photos by Trone Dowd

Members of the Greater Allen A.M.E. Cathedral Church in Jamaica joined city environmentalists to conduct a tour of the Royal Waste Service’s processing plant.
Photos by Trone Dowd

Last Saturday, those who have firsthand experience living next to one of three processing plants stood united for a “pray-in” at Detective Keith L. Williams Park, calling out Royal Waste for its disregard for the nearby residential area. According to residents, the company has been a consistently bad neighbor to this quiet portion of Jamaica, thanks to unbearable odors that worsen during the summer, loud trucks that have been tearing up local roadways and air pollution in dangerous proximity to the busy park.

The plant, located 168-56 Douglas Ave., is one of three waste transfer stations in the five boroughs. The Jamaica plant, together with the other two located in North Brooklyn and South Bronx, process three-quarters of the city’s trash. This accounts for 745 tons per day, equivalent to 270,000 tons a year, all coincidentally in communities of color.

Toxic runoff known as “leachate,” as seen here, comes from trucks that transfer garbage from the city to the processing station in Jamaica. Eddie Bautista of the NYC Environmental Justice Alliance strongly advised people to wash their shoes before stepping foot in their homes to keep from tracking the harmful chemicals around the house.

Toxic runoff known as “leachate,” as seen here, comes from trucks that transfer garbage from the city to the processing station in Jamaica. Eddie Bautista of the NYC Environmental Justice Alliance strongly advised people to wash their shoes before stepping foot in their homes to keep from tracking the harmful chemicals around the house.

A Jamaica resident who goes by the name of Lancaster moved into the neighborhood five years ago. He told the Press of Southeast Queens that he is often regretful that he purchased a house in this part of Jamaica due to the smell that gets pushed towards nearby homes.

“I wish I would have known,” Lancaster said.

He explained that the stench is not always present, as evident when he was mulling over the purchase. Impressed by the neighborhood’s aesthetics and closeness to both a park and school, the effect that the disposal has on the air was a complete surprise to him.

“When I have barbecues, I have to pray that the smell isn’t too bad,” Lancaster said.

“Imagine trying to explain that to guests.”

Lancaster said that he and many other residents are forced to keep all of their windows closed to avoid the stench from seeping into their homes.

Crystal Ervin, a resident and environmental justice advocate, said that she has been awakened in the middle of the night by the stench.

“I have been fighting this battle for my South Jamaica neighborhood for 17 years,” she said. “It’s a constant fight. This impacts so many people and we need the city to ensure the physical and environmental safety of the community. It’s not just the stench, it’s our health at stake.”

The fight to make garbage distribution more equitable throughout the five boroughs has raged on for years.

During a tour of the nearby facility organized by Greater Allen A.M.E.’s Rev. Andrew Wilkes, toxic runoff known as “leachate” could be seen pooling up on the grounds near the five-block industrial stretch. Protesters and environmental activists from Brooklyn, Southeast Queens and the Bronx complained throughout the tour, called the stench unbearable and reiterated that the odor only worsens in the summer.

“This is not simply an issue of environmental justice, it has political dimensions,” Wilkes said. “This has moral and spiritual underpinnings. We should be able to enjoy an environment without having to worry about our lungs being polluted. We want to uplift any and all solutions to this problem.”

City leaders have been looking into measures to smoothly transition away from overburdening small communities with a majority of the city’s garbage. In 2014, legislation was introduced by the City Council to enforce garbage processing equity. Councilmen Donovan Richards (D-Laurelton), Danny Dromm (D-Jaskson Heights), Rory Lancman (D-Hillcrest) and I. Daneek Miller (D-St. Albans) all co-sponsored the action.

“One community should not be responsible for handling such a large proportion of the city’s waste,” Miller said. “Residents in Southeast Queens continue to face unsafe and unhealthy conditions because of the many waste transfer stations near our parks, homes and schools, and we need a fair share policy that relieves us of this burden.

Mayor Bill de Blasio has also said that he wants to transition waste disposal to a more manageable zone system, making neighborhoods handle their own trash and not others. He has not made any effort to make this a reality.

There have been concerns about the safety of sanitation workers at the site for about a decade. In 2009, three workers with the S. Dahan Sewer Specialist company were killed by noxious fumes at the Jamaica waste plant after being hired by Royal to unclog a pipe at the bottom of the drywell.

“These businesses also don’t follow the labor practices that are necessary to keep these workers safe or give them the opportunity to support their families with fair wages,” Miller said.

Despite these incidents, however, Royal says that it has the community’s interests in mind every step of the way. In fact, Royal Vice President Mike Reaki responded to claims that the stench has lowered the quality of life in the surrounding neighborhoods.

“Royal Waste is from and for the community,” Reaki said. “Our owners and our staff are also from this community. Ninety-five percent of our staff live locally in the community. We provide high paying, high quality union jobs with full benefits and we often hire New Yorkers who face barriers to employment. Royal Waste is tremendously invested in the well-being and vitality of the community that we call home. We operate a facility according to all regulations set forth by city, state and federal regulators. We pride ourselves on the continuous raising and improving our safety and environmental standards.”

From Queens Times Ledger:

Queens leaders hold a ‘pray in’ at Jamaica dump

Jamaica residents hold hands at a “pray in” protesting the local dump.

Jamaica leaders held a ”pray in” at a notorious dump site in southeast Queens.

Protesters gathered outside 173rd Street and Liberty Avenue Saturday in front of the waste transfer station owned by Royal Waste Services before taking a tour of the grounds. The dump site is directly across the street from a park and residential homes.

The demonstrators claimed it was unfair that they were subjected to terrible smells and unclean air. They said low-income communities of color bear the burden of housing dumps and that workers at Royal Waste, most of whom live in the community, are treated unfairly.

The privately held company handles residential and commercial trash and has a recycling operation.

Legislation has been introduced that would cap the amount of trash that can be processed in one community. The de Blasio administration is transitioning New York to a zone system for commercial waste. Royal Waste is no stranger to controversy. Sanitation workers throughout the years have accused the company of labor abuses and between 2006 and 2009 four workers died on the Jamaica Royal Waste site.

Mike Reali, vice president of Royal Waste Services,s aid the owners and staff at the dump are from the community and they bring high paying union jobs with benefits to Jamaica residents.

“Royal Waste is tremendously invested in the well-being and vitality of the community we call home,” he said. “We operate a facility according to all regulations set forth by city, state and federal regulators. We pride ourselves on continuously raising and improving our safety and environmental standards.”

A bus filled with parishioners from the Greater Allen A.M.E Cathedral of New York and community members arrived at the site along with Rev. Andrew Wilkes and Councilman Daneek Miller (D- St. Albans).

The protestors held hands in a prayer circle where Wilkes said a prayer for the community.

“Environmen­tal racism pollutes God’s creation while burdening New York City’s communities of color with a disproportionate amount of trash,” he said. “The issue is an urgent matter of pastoral care. Congregates of Allen Cathedral often lament the danger of their children encountering fumes from the commercial waste tucks parked next to schools, homes and playgrounds.”

Eddie Bautista, executive director at New York City Environmental Justice Alliance, said lower income neighborhoods in the South Bronx, North Brooklyn and southeast Queens are being exposed to an overwhelming amount of fumes and it is up to them to unite and make sure the dump companies change.

“When it comes to commercial waste, we can’t have 200 companies converging on three or four communities,” he said. “We need to have these companies transform and create a new system, a system where they have to compete with each other not just for who makes the most money picking up the garbage, but which company treats the community and their workers the best. We don’t have to get the low hanging fruit anymore, those days are behind us. This is a city that talks a lot about equity, justice. We know now that the fight in DC is going to be a long one. None of us are afraid of long and hard fights, especially the African-American community that knows about long and hard fights.”

Miller and Wilkes led a tour of the grounds and the smell immediately overwhelmed the group. Residents were quick to remind everyone that in the summer that was the smell residents woke up to on a daily basis.

“This city and my colleagues talk a lot about justice and equity,” Miller said. “There is no reason why three, four communities in New York are responsible for 75 percent of the garbage. We just don’t want all the bad and negative things to be dropped in our community. Today we’re talking about environmental justice.

 

 

 

MORE PRESS ON JAMAICA POLLUTING ROYAL WASTE SERVICE WHICH WAS DUMPED IN DOWNTOWN AREA & IS POISON PEOPLE OF COLOR

It is finally good to see some more press from the local media on this totally obnoxious, foul smelling and poisonous Royal Waste that has MAJOR detrimental effects on this community, especially those that live nearby and have to do with the smell, noise and truck traffic from the awful business that NEVER should have been given a red light to operate so close to residents and a park.

Maybe with some church goers from Rev. Flake’s church some action will happen, but again, WHO GAVE THE GO AHEAD TO PUT THIS HERE and WHY hasn’ this been picked up from the media before, hell, I have been reporting on this since I got here in 2010 on the very blog.

ENVIRONMENTAL RACISM in Jamaica Queens, but then is anyone surprised by this bullshit.

FOLKS, you need to keep up the fight!

AND NO, GOOMBA Royal Waste Vice President Mike Reaki, ROYAL WASTE has NOT been a good neighbor at all, you are FUCKING PRICKS!!!

How many waste facilities in your community GOOMBA MIKE?

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From Queens Press:

Jamaica Residents Protest Foul-Smelling Waste Plant

ROYAL-PAIN

BY TRONE DOWD

The stench coming from a garbage processing plant controlled by Royal Waste has all but destroyed the quality of life for some residents along Liberty Avenue in Jamaica, inciting action from upset elected officials, the New York City Environmental Justice Alliance and congregants of the Greater Allen A.M.E. Cathedral.

Members of the Greater Allen A.M.E. Cathedral Church in Jamaica joined city environmentalists to conduct a tour of the Royal Waste Service’s processing plant. Photos by Trone Dowd

Members of the Greater Allen A.M.E. Cathedral Church in Jamaica joined city environmentalists to conduct a tour of the Royal Waste Service’s processing plant.
Photos by Trone Dowd

Last Saturday, those who have firsthand experience living next to one of three processing plants stood united for a “pray-in” at Detective Keith L. Williams Park, calling out Royal Waste for its disregard for the nearby residential area. According to residents, the company has been a consistently bad neighbor to this quiet portion of Jamaica, thanks to unbearable odors that worsen during the summer, loud trucks that have been tearing up local roadways and air pollution in dangerous proximity to the busy park.

The plant, located 168-56 Douglas Ave., is one of three waste transfer stations in the five boroughs. The Jamaica plant, together with the other two located in North Brooklyn and South Bronx, process three-quarters of the city’s trash. This accounts for 745 tons per day, equivalent to 270,000 tons a year, all coincidentally in communities of color.

Toxic runoff known as “leachate,” as seen here, comes from trucks that transfer garbage from the city to the processing station in Jamaica. Eddie Bautista of the NYC Environmental Justice Alliance strongly advised people to wash their shoes before stepping foot in their homes to keep from tracking the harmful chemicals around the house.

Toxic runoff known as “leachate,” as seen here, comes from trucks that transfer garbage from the city to the processing station in Jamaica. Eddie Bautista of the NYC Environmental Justice Alliance strongly advised people to wash their shoes before stepping foot in their homes to keep from tracking the harmful chemicals around the house.

A Jamaica resident who goes by the name of Lancaster moved into the neighborhood five years ago. He told the Press of Southeast Queens that he is often regretful that he purchased a house in this part of Jamaica due to the smell that gets pushed towards nearby homes.

“I wish I would have known,” Lancaster said.

He explained that the stench is not always present, as evident when he was mulling over the purchase. Impressed by the neighborhood’s aesthetics and closeness to both a park and school, the effect that the disposal has on the air was a complete surprise to him.

“When I have barbecues, I have to pray that the smell isn’t too bad,” Lancaster said.

“Imagine trying to explain that to guests.”

Lancaster said that he and many other residents are forced to keep all of their windows closed to avoid the stench from seeping into their homes.

Crystal Ervin, a resident and environmental justice advocate, said that she has been awakened in the middle of the night by the stench.

“I have been fighting this battle for my South Jamaica neighborhood for 17 years,” she said. “It’s a constant fight. This impacts so many people and we need the city to ensure the physical and environmental safety of the community. It’s not just the stench, it’s our health at stake.”

The fight to make garbage distribution more equitable throughout the five boroughs has raged on for years.

During a tour of the nearby facility organized by Greater Allen A.M.E.’s Rev. Andrew Wilkes, toxic runoff known as “leachate” could be seen pooling up on the grounds near the five-block industrial stretch. Protesters and environmental activists from Brooklyn, Southeast Queens and the Bronx complained throughout the tour, called the stench unbearable and reiterated that the odor only worsens in the summer.

“This is not simply an issue of environmental justice, it has political dimensions,” Wilkes said. “This has moral and spiritual underpinnings. We should be able to enjoy an environment without having to worry about our lungs being polluted. We want to uplift any and all solutions to this problem.”

City leaders have been looking into measures to smoothly transition away from overburdening small communities with a majority of the city’s garbage. In 2014, legislation was introduced by the City Council to enforce garbage processing equity. Councilmen Donovan Richards (D-Laurelton), Danny Dromm (D-Jaskson Heights), Rory Lancman (D-Hillcrest) and I. Daneek Miller (D-St. Albans) all co-sponsored the action.

“One community should not be responsible for handling such a large proportion of the city’s waste,” Miller said. “Residents in Southeast Queens continue to face unsafe and unhealthy conditions because of the many waste transfer stations near our parks, homes and schools, and we need a fair share policy that relieves us of this burden.

Mayor Bill de Blasio has also said that he wants to transition waste disposal to a more manageable zone system, making neighborhoods handle their own trash and not others. He has not made any effort to make this a reality.

There have been concerns about the safety of sanitation workers at the site for about a decade. In 2009, three workers with the S. Dahan Sewer Specialist company were killed by noxious fumes at the Jamaica waste plant after being hired by Royal to unclog a pipe at the bottom of the drywell.

“These businesses also don’t follow the labor practices that are necessary to keep these workers safe or give them the opportunity to support their families with fair wages,” Miller said.

Despite these incidents, however, Royal says that it has the community’s interests in mind every step of the way. In fact, Royal Vice President Mike Reaki responded to claims that the stench has lowered the quality of life in the surrounding neighborhoods.

“Royal Waste is from and for the community,” Reaki said. “Our owners and our staff are also from this community. Ninety-five percent of our staff live locally in the community. We provide high paying, high quality union jobs with full benefits and we often hire New Yorkers who face barriers to employment. Royal Waste is tremendously invested in the well-being and vitality of the community that we call home. We operate a facility according to all regulations set forth by city, state and federal regulators. We pride ourselves on the continuous raising and improving our safety and environmental standards.”

 

SUPPOSED JAMAICA LEADERS SHOULD LEAD BY EXAMPLE BUT ASSEMBLYMEN MEMBER ALICIA HYNDMAN’S OFFICE OUTSIDE LOOKS LIKE TYPICAL JAMAICA GHETTO TRASH

hyndmanThis was sent to me by a reader. Our “leaders” should led by example, but this is the Greater Jamaica area where even those folks seem to not give a shit. Why overall does some black communities in this area look so trashed all the time. But then do you really expect much from SE Queens elected officials. I know I certainly don’t. Christ, where is the damn pride, I mean this is your fucking office Hyndman, hire some broke ass homeless person to sweep up every day on your block. Trash on the streets, trash in the political offices. Asshole Councilman Ruben Wills is a be culprit of this.

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Looks like Assembly Women Alicia Hyndman could care less about appearances. The surrounding area around her headquarters on Merrick Blvd in Laurelton. And people wonder why SE Queens is a dumping ground. The photos speak for themselves, their elected officials could care less.hyndman5hyndman2hyndman3hyndman4

In front of Wills Office

In front of Wills Office