RUFUS KING PARK FINALLY GETS MUCH NEEDED PARK ENFORCEMENT – WHAT TOOK SO DAMN LONG

Damn, that white boy in the back is cutting up some good shit.

My sources have informed that Rufus King Park, which has been turning into a garbage dump and an outdoor homeless shelter with alcohol drinking and drug use, is FINALLY get much needed park enforcement in the evenings and on weekends, which is when it tends to be very problematic.

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Seems like I am not the only one who has been raising a fuss about how this park has been going down hill.

NOW time to tackle that much smaller but more problematic park, Major Mark Park.

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YOUNG EDUCATED PEOPLE IN JAMAICA ARE MOVING OUT NOT BECAUSE THEY DON’T HAVE MONEY TO BUY (THEY CAN RENT AS OPPOSED TO WHAT VANEL SAID), THEY’RE MOVING OUT BECAUSE THEY DON’T WANT TO LIVE IN A FILTHY GHETTO MINDED HOOD RAT COMMUNITY

Total bullshit and a lie from Assembly Member Clyde Vanel:

In terms of affordability, he said that southeast Queens’ longtime foreclosure problem has been “slowing down” and that he is trying to keep prices low enough to attract younger people and make sure there is no “exodus” from the neighborhood. “Our young people go and live in Williamsburg or they move to Harlem or they move to Fort Green or they move to Astoria,” he said. “Part of the reason is that we don’t have rentals here, you have to buy a house—but even when they buy, they buy elsewhere. We want to be able to attract them and keep them here and buy here.”

BIG LIE: Part of the reason is that we don’t have rentals here.

YES, Vanel we do have plenty of rentals here in Jamaica, so I don’t know what the hell you are talking about, Zara Realty alone, which has many buildings in the downtown area have rentals. Yeah, maybe in places like Queens Village or Laurelton or other far off areas from Downtown, BUT young people are not going to live in those areas, there is no subway access and they sure are not going hop some crappy Jamaica Bus for a long ride to the subway. SO THAT IS A LIE.

The young people who are leaving are bright, educated, hard working individuals who don’t want to live in some filthy garbage strewn ghetto mentality community. You mentioned Williamsburg, Harlem and Fort Greene, which all three are completely different from Jamaica. They are NOT GHETTO, they have nice stores, restaurants, cafes and bars. They have a night life and things to do.

NEWSFLASH: Not all young black (or older) folks are ghetto or uneducated and they like nice things and not the bullshit nonsense that happens in ghetto communities like Jamaica.  Jamaica pretty much has NOTHING to offer smart educated young people, so they move out to something more of their liking.

You elected officials still do not fucking get it. You can build all the damn buildings you want, but if you don’t clean it up, you don’t maintain the parks, and you stop having tons of homeless shelters in the area and shelters that could be rental apartments like the big El Camino homeless shelter on 8930 16st St, which was an apartment building until they turned into this homeless shelter with problematic people in 2007. AND to give community board 12 credit (and even former BP Helen Marshall) for trying to fight what the damn city was cramming down their throat (http://www.qchron.com/editions/eastern/jamaica-couples-shelter-open-for-nearly-one-year/article_71d5b1d5-75e2-5e67-a1db-75a78938e569.html).

The area needs CLEANED UP, better businesses, proper enforcement on quality of life issues and a nightlife .

Damn elected officials, I mean how can you just flat out lie in this day and age. I guess that is just the norm anymore with them (look at our President Man Child).

Dangerous falling apart vacant homes with garbage. By the way to this day (6.30.17) this place is still boarded up.

 

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From Queens Press:

New Pols Envision The Future of Southeast Queens

BY JAMES FARRELL

As southeast Queens continues to develop, the new faces of in the region’s political sphere are weighing its pressing needs and future growth.

Political-Profiles-Clyde-Vanel

Clyde Vanel

Assemblyman Clyde Vanel (D-Queens Village) said that his top priority is to make it a more affordable place to live—particularly for younger people looking to start their lives.

Vanel also described his vision of what he called “Silicon Jamaica”—expanding the financial hub of downtown Jamaica to include a technology industry for the area.

“They’re building a number of high rises down there and there’s going to be some office space included and we’re trying to attract bigger companies and we’re trying to attract a tech industry to downtown Jamaica,” Vanel said.

Vanel said that “Silicon Jamaica” was in its “infancy stage,” but that he has passed a bill to study pockets in the city that need better access to high-speed broadband internet. He said that a stronger infrastructure there could help attract those tech companies.

Donovan Richards

Donovan Richards

He described his district as a “great community” with a large number of homeowners and a working-class and middle-class neighborhood. For Vanel, increasing affordability starts with expanding job opportunities.

“The next generation and the current generation have to be able to have jobs and businesses and entrepreneurships to be able to afford to buy the houses in this neighborhood and maintain and live in the neighborhood,” he said. “We have to make sure we attract those jobs and we help build the businesses to be able to maintain and sustain the future of southeast Queens.”

The most immediate area for attention, he said, is the future of John F. Kennedy Airport, which recently received $10 billion for redevelopment. Vanel hopes to connect the surrounding community to the possible benefits of the reconstruction.

“We are an airport community,” he said. “We have companies in our neighborhood that are employment agencies that need those contracts. We also have restaurants and restaurateurs coming out of Queens that don’t have any of the retail spaces at the airport. That’s our biggest economic generator in southeast Queens and we are not properly invested in that airport.”

In terms of affordability, he said that southeast Queens’ longtime foreclosure problem has been “slowing down” and that he is trying to keep prices low enough to attract younger people and make sure there is no “exodus” from the neighborhood.

“Our young people go and live in Williamsburg or they move to Harlem or they move to Fort Green or they move to Astoria,” he said. “Part of the reason is that we don’t have rentals here, you have to buy a house—but even when they buy, they buy elsewhere. We want to be able to attract them and keep them here and buy here.”

Councilman Donovan Richards (D-Laurelton) agreed with Vanel’s assessment that southeast Queens is having a difficult time retaining young residents.

“We’re a low density neighborhood, but we’re a neighborhood that young people are finding hard to stay in,” Richards said. “A lot of our young people don’t have [the money] because wages are not as high.”

Richards added that building more affordable housing, senior facilities and revitalizing commercial areas, such as Merrick Boulevard with its empty storefronts, can help.

“One thing I’m looking at is land use and how we unlock potential in my area,” he said. “On average, people in Laurelton earn 80 percent [of the Area Median Income], but the boulevard doesn’t reflect it.”

TREE OF LIFE DEVELOPMENT: ANOTHER AFFORDABLE HOUSING UNIT BREAKS GROUND IN DOWNTOWN JAMAICA

Damn, shit is really happening here in Jamaica and some good shit. This affordable housing on 164th Street between Jamaica & 89 Ave actually looks pretty good and it Eco-friendly as well.

Of course the usual political buffoons like Leroy Comrie & Melinda Katz were there for a photo op with safety helmets and shovels. The shovels used to pick up all the bullshit that flowed out of their mouths.

NOW, will any of this actually help improve the community and give us a better quality of life, especially since homeless shelters seem to be aplenty, the walking dead seem to be all over and that poisonous polluting waste dump, Royal Waste and all their damn trucks,  are still here right in downtown Jamaica causing a poor quality of life.

Royal Waste is one MAJOR BLIGHT that needs to really go and go now.

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From Queens Press:

Tree of Life Development Breaks Ground In SEQ

2-Ground-breaking

Southeast Queens elected officials help celebrate the kick-off of the building’s construction. Photo by Trone Dowd

The First Presbyterian Church in Jamaica broke ground last week on a $74 million affordable housing project located on 164th Street at Jamaica Avenue, adding to the growing number of affordable housing units being constructed in southeast Queens.

The Tree of Life is the first project to get off the ground for the First Jamaica Community and Urban Development Corporation (FJCUDC) non-profit, which has a mission to “ensure quality affordable housing for New Yorkers” as well as “connect people with vital social service needs.” The 12-story building will feature 174 units, 53 of which will be permanently affordable. It will also have 64 parking spaces for residents and 13,000 square feet of community facility space. The development will also meet energy efficiency standards of the Passive Housing Institute—a voluntary measure for reducing a building’s ecological footprint—to ensure that it is entirely eco-friendly.

A rendering of the Tree of Life building in Jamaica.  Photo Courtesy of First Jamaica Community and Urban Development Corporation

A rendering of the Tree of Life building in Jamaica.
Photo Courtesy of First Jamaica Community and Urban Development Corporation

According to the FJCUDC, apartments will be available to individuals with a maximum income limit ranging from $33,400 to $73,480 and families with combined incomes of $42,950 to $94,490. It will feature a number of amenities, including a community center, daycare facility and a yet-to-be-determined health care entity. Due to efforts by the church, the property will also feature a food pantry, soup kitchen and clothing closet to help those in need.

Programs will be made available to residents free of charge and include basic educational programs, financial literacy classes and other enrichment workshops meant to “grow the lives of Jamaica residents.”

A number of elected officials—including state Sen. Leroy Comrie (D-St. Albans), Queens Borough President Melinda Katz and Councilmen I. Daneek Miller (D-St. Albans) and Rory Lancman (D-Hillcrest)—attended the groundbreaking ceremony on Friday in the First Presbyterian parking lot.

Reverend Patrick O’Connor told attendees at the groundbreaking that the Tree of Life building was a long time coming. In fact, he and his congregation began work on the development in 2005.

“We wanted to build something that would help the community,” O’Connor said.

Once known as “The Vitamin Tree,” O’Connor and his congregation worked with a number of investors and spoke to local residents in Southeast Queens, who made the need for housing, healthcare and childcare clear.

“The concept of the Tree of Life came out of those surveys,” he said. “And over the years, those relationships grew and developed the project that we’re starting today.”

Construction on the building is expected to conclude in winter 2018.

YET ANOTHER “AFFORDABLE HOUSING” COMPLEX GOING UP – BUT JUST TWO BLOCKS FROM THE POISONOUS POLLUTING ROYAL WASTE DUMP & TONS OF TRUCK TRAFFIC

By the way this s hit still has not been cleaned up as of 7.14.14

First who knows if it will be 100% affordable by the time this is done, which these so-called “affordable housing” are really not that affordable. AND this one, which will replace a dilapidated NYPD garbage, will be just a couple of blocks from the foul smelling, polluting and poisonous waste dump, Royal Waste.

CB 12 Chairwoman Adrienne Adams, called the current site a “blight” and saying her board is thrilled the area will be turned into “something beautiful.”

First off, “blight”is too strong a term for this NYPD parking garbage (though it always has tons of litter, the grass surrounding it never gets cut and it is in disrepair, but if we are going to talk BLIGHT, what about that poisonous foul smelling Royal Waste Dump, just two blocks from this future housing. Or what about 93rd Avenue between 170th and 171st Street, where many one family houses were torn down to put up low-class third world shit hole apartment buildings that resemble shit you see in third world countries. What about all those thug auto body shop all along Merrick Blvd. How about Hillside Avenue between 168th and 173rd. Or what about much of South Jamaica, especially south of York College. Hell you want to talk BLIGHT, any of these places I mentioned are more of a blight that this dilapidated parking garbage.

Thug Auto Body Shop at 102-80 Merrick

More typical South Jamaica. As of 7.14.14, pretty much looks the same.

The James Fobb Estate

Polluting solid waste company, Royal Waste, dumped into a residential area, a few blocks from Downtown, thanks to elected officials.

THIRD WORLD DRECK

Also the site is at 168 St and Archer Ave, not 93rd as stated in the article. It eventually turns into 93 Ave, but not at this point.

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From Queens Chronicle:

Boro Board approves Jamaica housing plan

At least 350 affordable units to be built where NYPD parking sits now

The proposed affordable housing development on 168th Street and 93rd Avenue in Jamaica has been given the green light by an enthusiastic Borough Board.

The plan put forth by real estate development firm Omni — presented to the Borough Board on Monday — calls for the construction of “a minimum of” 350 units of affordable housing, along with 75,000 square feet of retail space and 15,000 square feet set aside for community use.

The dilapidated two-story NYPD parking garage at the site, not far from the 103rd Precinct, will be demolished this winter to make room for construction shortly after.

The new building’s parking garage will contain about 180 spaces, with at least 60 set aside for NYPD use.

A major aspect of the Jamaica Now community revitalization plan, the proposed structure is about three years away from being constructed and opened, according to Gbenga Dawodu, the city Economic Development Corp.’s assistant vice president of real estate.

“The proposed project will not only provide much-needed affordable housing and neighborhood retail,” Dawodu said, “but will help provide the NYPD with a new and improved parking facility and create jobs in the local community.”

The EDC’s request for proposal was first issued in February 2015, with the agency selecting Omni’s proposal this January.

Early iterations of the firm’s proposal included a YMCA at the site, but Omni Managing Director Eugene Schneur said that is no longer the case.

“Instead of the YMCA, we will have 15,000 square feet of community space,” Schneur said. “We hope at least part of it will be a daycare center or some other educational facility.”

Both Councilman Daneek Miller (D-St. Albans) and Borough President Melinda Katz responded by saying there should “absolutely” be some sort of youth center within the building in place of a YMCA.

“We have had conversations before about a youth center; that is really our intent,” Katz said. “We’re hoping this building will be accommodating to that.”

Before casting his vote, Miller said the reimagining of the 168th Street site has been “a long time coming.”

“I think this project really reflects the values of the community in so many ways,” Miller said. “We are really looking forward to this project getting off the ground.”

Not everyone at Monday’s meeting was as excited about the plan, however, as Community Board 7 Chairman Gene Kelty said he believes a 180-space parking garage is not remotely large enough to serve the building’s tenants, the Police Department, shoppers and neighborhood residents looking to utilize the community space.

“My counterpart in board 12, I just want you to know you’re going to have a terrible problem with the parking over there because they don’t have sufficient parking,” Kelty said to CB 12 Chairwoman Adrienne Adams. “If you don’t lock down the site for the Police Department, they will creep into another area over there if they don’t end up with 60 spaces.”

Adams didn’t address Kelty’s concerns, instead calling the site a “blight” and saying her board is thrilled the area will be turned into “something beautiful.”

$368 PER MONTH STUDIOS UP FOR LOTTERY IN LOCUST MANOR IN JAMAICA AS WELL AS 1 & 2 BEDROOMS APARTMENTS

Let’s try not to get hood rats in here who pimp out young underage girls, like St. Alban’s Joseph Gilbert did for 4 months with a 15 year old girl in Rev. Floyd Flake’s Greater Allen Senior Residence on Merrick Blvd, which the Flake nor Greater Allen Church have still not made any comment or returned phone calls for reporters since this broke on June 1st (https://cleanupjamaicaqueens.wordpress.com/2017/06/09/flake-dynasty-greater-allen-a-m-e-church-still-refusing-to-speak-to-press-in-regards-to-15-year-old-girl-being-pimped-out-for-4-months-in-their-greater-allen-cathedral-senior-residence/).

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From DNAInfo New York:

$368-Per-Month Studios Up for Grabs in South Jamaica

By Ewa Kern-Jedrychowska | June 14, 2017 5:08pm
 More than 80 affordable units, including studios that will rent for $368 a month, are up for grabs in this new residential building in South Jamaica.

More than 80 affordable units, including studios that will rent for $368 a month, are up for grabs in this new residential building in South Jamaica.View Full Caption

D&F Development Group LLC

QUEENS — More than 80 affordable units — including studios that will rent for as low as $368 a month — are up for grabs in a new residential building in South Jamaica.

The eight-story Pavilion at Locust Manor, at 171-04 Baisley Blvd. near Marsden Street, is located less than a mile away from the LIRR Locust Manor station.

The newly constructed smoke-free building features elevators, security cameras, a visual intercom system, parking lot, laundry and community rooms, and bicycle storage, according to the listing posted on the NYC Housing Connect website.

Those earning 30, 40, 50, 60 and 100 percent of the area median income can apply for eight studios, 31 one-bedrooms and 45 two-bedrooms, which are priced between $368 and $1,511 a month, depending on income and the size of the family.

For example, the listing includes three studios that will rent for $368 a month available to single applicants who earn between $14,503 and $20,040 a year.

There will also be six one-bedroom units for $558 a month for one person making between $21,086 and $26,720a year or two people earning between $21,086 and $30,560 a year.

The listing also includes 20 two-bedroom units for $1,065 a month for two people making between $36,503 and $45,840 a year, three people earning between $38,503 and $51,540 a year or four-person households making between $38,503 and $57,240 a year, according to the income requirements.

To see the complete list of available apartments in the building, their prices and income requirements go here.

► READ MORE: How to Apply for Affordable Housing in New York City

► READ MORE: INTERACTIVE: What is AMI?

► READ MORE: Here’s How to Boost Your Odds of Scoring Affordable Housing

Applicants who live in Queens Community Board 12, which includes Jamaica, St. Albans, Hollis, South Ozone Park and Springfield Gardens, will get a preference for half of the units.

The property belongs to the D&F Development Group LLC, a Long Island-based developer who is receiving a tax exemption under the 421-a program in exchange for providing the affordable units. The developer is also currently constructing a 53-unit, eight-story building nearby called the Horizon at Locust Manor, which will include some Section 8 units, according to the company’s website.

The lottery opened on June 14 and the deadline to apply is Aug. 14. Those interested can apply by mail or online through the city’s Housing Connect system.

PLENTY OF EVENTS COMING UP IN JAMAICA INCLUDING QUEENS INTERNATIONAL CHILDREN’S FESTIVAL & GROOVIN’ IN THE PARK WITH R. KELLY

Plenty happening in Jamaica next weekend.

QUEENS INTERNATIONAL CHILDREN’S FESTIVAL

COMMUNITY IFTAR

GROOVIN’ IN THE PARK

From The Daily News:

CARIBBEAT: ‘Groovin in the Park’ means the best reggae and R&B — from R. Kelly to Freddie McGregor

Famed Jamaican vocalist Ken Boothe, former Heptones lead singer Leroy Sibbles and veteran singer-producer Freddie McGregor are some of 2017 Groovin In The Park performers who attended a launch event earlier this year at the Crowne Plaza Hotel in Queens.

(Groovin’ In The Park © 2017)

Boasting a host of performers, such as American R&B singer-songwriter R. Kelly and soulful reggae singer Freddie McGregor, the “Groovin in the Park” event easily lives up to its claim of being North America’s largest annual reggae and R&B concert.

Patrons are eagerly awaiting the June 25 concert at Roy Wilkins Park in Queens, which also stars singer Leroy Sibbles of Heptones fame; veteran U-Roy, known as the “Originator;” dancehall’s Busy Signal; smooth singer Ken Boothe, aka “Mr. Rock Steady;” roots reggae singer Tarrus Riley; and Lloyd Parks of the We The People band.

And the Groovin’ in the Park experience has gone mobile this year with the introduction of an information-packed app. Available for Apple and android platforms. The app features exclusive content — artist interviews, event news, giveaways and more.

1 | 5 Innovative R&B great R. Kelly is part of the 2017 Groovin’ in the Park lineup. (www.r-kelly.com)

A family friendly event, children under 12 years old are admitted free to the concert with the requisite proof.

CARIBBEAT: Tech for Virgin Islands during Caribbean Week in NYC

Tickets range from $65 for standard admission to $160 for VIP seating (with meals and beverages) and $260 for exclusive VVIP skybox seating (with meals and premium beverages).

Roy Wilkins Park is at 177-01 Baisley Blvd. near Merrick Blvd. Gate opens at 11 a.m.

Visit www.groovininthepark.com for information

Send email to groovinintheparkinc@gmail.com or call (347) 980-2252.

 

THE CHANGING FACE OF JAMAICA: CREATIVE TOUCH PAINT PARTY JAMAICA’S FIRST “PAINT & SIP” OPENS ON JAMAICA AVENUE – AND IT IS MINORITY OWNED

Jamaica has its first “Paint & Sip” business, Creative Touch Paint Party (CTPP), located at 197-05 Jamaica Avenue and it is the only minority owned “paint & sip” in Queens. Owners Leslie Lopez, of Woodhaven, and Stacey Michael, of Springfield Gardens, celebrated the grand opening recently at its Jamaica location, where the duo displayed to the public their love for art, gatherings and fun with friends.

Just recently JCAL, had their first “Paint, Wine & Cheese Party”. For those who do not know, these “paint and sip” are big in Manhattan and Brooklyn and now Jamaica has it’s first one courtesy of these two ladies.

They not only have just “paint & sip” events, but they hold painting classes for children and a six-week long summer program for youngsters. The center also provides fitness classes, including cardio, weight lifting, yoga and Zumba-style workouts.

Their website is http://www.creativetouchpaintparty.com.

And speaking of Yoga, hopefully, Jamaica will get a Yoga studio, which I am still surprised there is not one.

Yes, Jamaica is changing.

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From Queens Press:

Jamaica Business Turns Novices Into Urban Picassos

15-Hollis-art-4

Creative Touch Paint Party founders Stacey Michael (left) and Leslie Lopez (right). Photos by Ariel Hernandez

BY ARIEL HERNANDEZ

From a stint on the New York City’s Board of Education to a lasting friendship, two Queens residents have opened Creative Touch Paint Party (CTPP), a paint and sip business in Jamaica that focuses on cultural pieces, following a year-long hunt for the perfect space and neighborhood for the facility.

15-Hollis-art-2

Leslie Lopez, of Woodhaven, and Stacey Michael, of Springfield Gardens, celebrated the grand opening of CTPP at its Jamaica location, where the duo displayed to the public their love for art, gatherings and fun with friends.

“While paint and sips have become more common, we wanted to put a twist on it, creating cultural pieces that spoke to us, rather than painting sunsets and beaches,” Michael said. “We want to focus on pieces that represent us and that we’d be proud to hang up in our house.”

In an effort to differentiate from other paint and sips, CTPP provides refreshments—such as cheese, crackers and fruit—but also butler service and refills of drinks and snacks, so that the attendee doesn’t lose their place during the class. Although paint and sips traditionally involve painting while drinking wine, Michael and Lopez encourage their clients to bring their own bottles—whether it be wine, sparking water or juice.

But paint and sips are not the only events provided by CTPP. The duo holds painting classes for children and a six-week long summer program for youngsters. The center also provides fitness classes, including cardio, weight lifting, yoga and Zumba-style workouts. For clients looking to celebrate a birthday party, bridal shower or other event at CTPP, the facility also provides private venue rental space.

Paintings created by Creative Touch Paint Party clients spread proudly around the business’ new facility.

Paintings created by Creative Touch Paint Party clients spread proudly around the business’ new facility.

Michael said that she and Lopez are looking for new ways to serve the community.

“[We want to] be a one-stop shop close by, where you don’t have to travel to Brooklyn or to the other side of Queens [and] you can get the best service possible,” Michael said. “There’s other paint and sips. There are other businesses they can go to. But it’s not in this community. I’m proud to say that we’re the only minority paint and sip business in Queens.”

Following the grand opening last Friday, CTPP held its first class on June 3, during which clients painted “My Sister’s Keeper.”

“It’s just a good feeling when you can come to something that you love,” Lopez said. “That you can do something with art and have people leave here happy with what they’ve done.”

Lopez said that when seeking the perfect name for CTPP, the duo knew they wanted people to be creative with their art and using their own colors and that CTPP was ensuring that each person’s piece is individual to them.

“At the end of the day, they’re taking [their painting] home and hanging it in whatever part of their house that they want, so we want to make sure that they’re creative,” Lopez said. “Creative Touch stands for painting creative pieces, while using your own touch.”

The duo’s motto is: “You come in a beginner and leave an urban Picasso.”

With a goal to expand CTPP and turn it into a franchise, the women are motivated by how far they have come.
Lopez said that the fact they have their own space after operating mobile, hosting paint and sips at other venues is proof that dreams can come true.

“If you put your mind into it, you can really make it happen,” Lopez said. “From where we started, from the beginning, through the ups and downs that you really go through, not realizing that you’re going through it—to then see success. It’s proof that there’s a brighter light and you’ll get there if you don’t give up.”

Michael said that as two women, one of whom is a mother, it is empowering to own a business.

The women encourage Queens residents to drop by CTPP for a paint and sip. CTPP is open from Tuesday through Sunday and Michael and Lopez schedule events based on client requests. Beginning on July 8, there will be fitness classes held on Saturdays and, possibly, Sundays based on client interest. Although CTPP is not currently open on Mondays, Michael and Lopez are willing to make arrangements if clients are interested in attending a class or hosting an event on that day.

Creative Touch Paint Party is located at 197-05 Jamaica Ave. For more information, visit http://www.creativetouchpaintparty.com.