THE “CHIPOTLE ARMEGEDDON” STILL CONTINUES AND THE BEST COMMENT ON WHY JAMAICA AVENUE SHOULD HAVE A CHIPOTLE

Who knew that the mention of a Chipotle coming to Jamaica could get some people in a damn tizzy (https://cleanupjamaicaqueens.wordpress.com/2017/05/21/reality-check-folks-chipotle-coming-to-the-ave-is-not-the-end-of-the-world-or-gentrification-it-is-just-a-fucking-chipolte-a-couple-of-notches-above-taco-bell-not-some-fancy-5-star-french/). Wish there was this much reaction to the garbage strewn, nonsense mess that is what Jamaica seems to be about (which is one reason for the development), but that, not a peep from the crew, but attempts at improving this ghetto run down area just slightly has hood rat panties in an uproar.

Since I posted this, on the Clean Up Jamaica Queens Facebook Page, 1,258 folks were reached, 3,312 had reactions, comments & shares combined with 756 comments on the shared. Damn, it is a Chipotle, not a cure for cancer or the end of the world. Even though there were plenty of negative comments (mostly from the young crew), overall, the majority of people found this new bit of info in a positive light, even though some people seemed to be more stuck on the term “Downtown Jamaica” as opposed to the hood phrase, “The Ave”, which I have not heard it called that since I moved here several years ago. BUT get over a damn name folks, before some of you coined it the ghetto “The Ave”, back in the pre-garbage strewn days it was just Jamaica Avenue before it became ghettoized.

But speaking of shared comments, this happened to be the best one on Clean Up Jamaica Queens Facebook on WHY we should have a Chipotle here in Jamaica, Downtown Jamaica, Jamaica Avenue, The Ave or DoJam.

Sight of the new Chipotle in Jamaica at corner of Jamaica Avenue & 160 Street

I mean… I’m biased in this situation because Chipotle is my everything. But, what is a Downtown Jamaica? #SouthsideJamaicaQueens  In addition, call me oblivious, but what is wrong with a little gentrification? So, you guys would really rather have FOUR stripper shoe stores than 3 stripper shoe stores and a Chipotle?  I’m just saying .

SO CHIPOTLE IN JAMAICA CAUSES SUCH AN OUTRAGE FOR SOME IN THE COMMUNITY, BUT THE GHETTO CRAP THAT WAS IN THAT SPACE WAS JUST FINE & DANDY – REALLY

Chipotle is planning to open its new restaurant at 160-02 Jamaica Ave. (DNAinfo/Ewa Kern-Jedrychowska)

So having a Chipotle at the corner of Jamaica and 160th Street (SW corner) on “The Ave” in “DownTown Jamaica” in the section known as “DoJam” is the end of life as we know it in Jamaica for some folks (https://cleanupjamaicaqueens.wordpress.com/2017/05/21/reality-check-folks-chipotle-coming-to-the-ave-is-not-the-end-of-the-world-or-gentrification-it-is-just-a-fucking-chipolte-a-couple-of-notches-above-taco-bell-not-some-fancy-5-star-french/) causing laughable comments on Facebook like:

The Regentrification of Jamaica Centre, Jamaica has already begun. First Starbucks now Chipotle! Hmmmmm!

If I see one more post abt down town Jamaica. Mother fucker this isn’t manhattan it’s called the fucking ave dick heads. On another note cool chipotle gone be over there. Still another sign of gentrification.

Right lmao tryna make it sound sophisticated n shit

OOOOOHHH IT’S OVER

But the ghetto crap that was there before was just fine and dandy.

Classy! Jamaica Ave and 160th St

GET REAL FOLKS and as I said before, it is just a fucking Chipotle. You mean the Jamaica ghetto bar is so fucking low, that some of you are threatened by mediocre Chipotle. Oh, MY, it is the END OF JAMAICA. Have you ever walked along the entire length of “The Ave from 170th to Parsons, pretty much most of it already looks like the end of Jamaica, the shit back-end of Jamaica.

Jamaica in the box retail

Shit retail litter Jamaica Avenue. This display is totally illegal according to DOB rules, yet nothing is done about this.

Shit Jamaica Ave retail crap tossed out on the street.

NE corner of 163th & Jamaica Ave.

Jamaica Ave, although this looks even worse when I saw it the other day.

 

ANTHONY BOURDAIN WILL EAT HIS WAY THRU QUEENS INCLUDING WOODHAVEN, SOUTH OZONE PARK & JAMAICA TONIGHT (5.21.17) @ 9PM ON “PARTS UNKNONW” (CNN)

TV host, author and  chef, Anthony Bourdain, will be eating his way through Queens in Sunday’s episode of “Parts Unknown” at 9pm on CNN. He will be visiting three places in the SE Queens area, Woodhaven (Neirs Tavern), South Ozone Park (Aqueduct Trace Track ) and Jamaica (Africana Restaurant on Liberty Avenue).

And don’t get your hood rat panties in a bunch like so many did when they heard that Chipotle was coming to The Ave(https://cleanupjamaicaqueens.wordpress.com/2017/05/21/reality-check-folks-chipotle-coming-to-the-ave-is-not-the-end-of-the-world-or-gentrification-it-is-just-a-fucking-chipolte-a-couple-of-notches-above-taco-bell-not-some-fancy-5-star-french/). This is not the secret scheme to gentrify Jamaica, it is a damn TV show highlighting places in Queens.

————————————————————————-

From Queens Courier:

Photo courtesy of CNN/Parts Unknown
Anthony Bourdain visits Queens in the latest episode of “Parts Unknown.”

Queens residents know that the borough’s people and food are one of a kind. But on Sunday, the entire country will be in on the secret, too.

Television host, author and chef Anthony Bourdain will eat his way through Queens and chat with interesting people who call the borough home in his latest episode of “Parts Unknown,” set to air on May 21 at 9 p.m. on CNN.

 The host showcases several neighborhoods throughout his journey and illustrates how easy it is to explore a variety of different cultures with just a quick train ride.

Food writer Laurie Woolver, who is Bourdain’s personal assistant and cookbook co-author, has lived in Jackson Heights for nine years and knew that the borough deserved its own episode.

“I’m always kind of slipping in a reminder of just how great Queens is,” she said. “I would just kind of mention, ‘I ate at this great place’ or ‘this taco cart’ or ‘I went to Flushing,’ subtly sort of reminding [Bourdain] of this place across the river he had to take a look at.”

In the episode, he eats from a food cart serving Ecuadorian food in Corona and discusses the sometimes difficult permit process vendors must navigate with Sean Basinski, director of the Street Vendor Project. We’re also introduced to Evelia Coyotzi, a Mexican immigrant who lost her job after 9/11, but was able to carve out a living by selling delicious tamales from a food cart in Jackson Heights.

He also stops in Flushing at Yu Garden Dumpling House on Kissena Boulevard to feast on dumplings with Heems, a Queens born-and-bred rapper who is one-half of the rap duo Swet Shop Boys. Spicy beef and tripes and boiled pig tongue marinated in ginger and soy and served with chili oil are also on the menu.

The 7 train is featured prominently in the episode and viewers can see just how drastically each neighborhood along the line can differ. In addition to showcasing restaurants, viewers are also treated to a dance by Korean senior citizens at Korean Community Services.

The historic Neirs Tavern in Woodhaven makes an appearance and Bourdain recounts the bar’s early beginnings as a tavern for gamblers visiting a local race track in the 1820s. The Blue Pump Room, The Old Abbey and the Union Course Tavern were just some of its previous names.

He speaks to the owner Loycent Gordon, a Jamaican-born FDNY firefighter, about the bar’s history and his own background as an immigrant whose mother was able to provide him a better life by moving to the borough. The bar was only three days away from closing before Gordon saved it.

“I think it’s pretty much the similar story of immigrants that come to the United States,” Gordon said. “They come to work hard because it’s the land of opportunity and they find a way to kind of make it out of the rut.”

Viewers also learn about the borough’s ever-changing demographics. Though Jackson Heights still contains a large Hispanic and south Asian population, an influx of Tibetans now call the neighborhood home. Lhasa Fast Food, sandwiched between cellphone stores and jewelry shops in Jackson Heights, introduces Queens to Tibetan cuisine like a plate of hand torn noodles with chilies and ginger.

Bourdain also visits the Rockaways to discuss the struggles residents faced after Superstorm Sandy and the city’s historic lack of investment in the neighborhood. He stops in South Ozone Park at the Aqueduct Race Track with Woolver to bet on horse number 2 and makes a pit stop in Jamaica to dine at Africana Restaurant on Liberty Avenue.

“Despite living here, spending my time here…I’m constantly amazed by what’s going on, the range of things that are happening, the restaurants I’ve never heard of,” Woolver said. “You’ll never really learn everything about it and it’s always evolving.”

Though the food is a main attraction in this episode, viewers will also take away how incredible it is that people who may have grown up thousands of miles away from the United States can proudly call Queens home.

“If the American Dream is alive, it’s alive in places like Queens,” Heems said in the episode. “There still are people coming here with nothing and making something out of it.”

REALITY CHECK FOLKS: CHIPOTLE COMING TO “THE AVE” IS NOT THE END OF THE WORLD OR “GENTRIFICATION”, IT IS JUST A FUCKING CHIPOLTE, A COUPLE OF NOTCHES ABOVE TACO BELL, NOT SOME FANCY 5 STAR FRENCH RESTAURANT – GET OVER IT

OH MY FUCKING GOD.  While my recent post about the opening of Chipotle in downtown Jamaica (that some hate that term) on the Ave  (https://cleanupjamaicaqueens.wordpress.com/2017/05/19/chipotle-planning-to-open-in-downtown-jamaica-on-the-ave/) had many liking that idea, there were, of course (it’s Jamaica), those who thought a 5 star fancy French Restaurant with valet parking was coming and that it was the end for Jamaica and major gentrification. One commented “They shutting Down The Ave

REALITY CHECK FOLKS, it is only a fucking Chipotle. A CHIPOTLE, owned by McDonald’s and a two notches above Taco Bell and a notch below AppleBee’s. Probably the same folks who were outraged that how dare an Applebee’s come into the  hood and ruin “The Ave” and all it’s crappiness.

That “Chipotle Armageddon” post on Clean Up Jamaica Queens Facebook page was shared like crazy and some of the Jamaica residents (mostly young) thought it was Armageddon Gentrification.  Many also hated the term “Downtown Jamaica”, which, was a term I coined when I first moved here to Jamaica, because, well, it is the business district with businesses, etc, so I would call it that, then down the road, I noticed the powers that be and developers were using it all the time. Again, get over the use of that, I mean it is a downtown area, small, but a downtown area, never the less. I am partial to “The Ave”, much hipper and cooler, so maybe you don’t want that because then you will notice developers and greedy real estate agency saying “Great apartment location and just a few blocks from  THE AVE, where you can work & play.”

This was one of the top highest posts since this blog was created, with the “Chipotle Armageddon” reaching 1,019 and 1,957 (readers, comments & shares). While as can be seen, most liked it, there were of course the ones, who cannot stand to see any type of positive progress in Jamaica and look at it as “gentrification”, which when you think about it is a sad state of mentality with some people here, they would be content to see Jamaica continue as a trashed, crime ridden, nonsense, crap retail/food ghetto place. While there are some things I like about the area and I do like that real urban feel (as compared to fake hipster cool), the area does need cleaning up and some sprucing here and there and that means some nice places to balance out the crap like 99 cent stores, cheap electronic stores, tons of beauty supply stores, crappy food choices and flea market type retail.

Anyway, I had to post some of the comments where folks were in an outrage and I found some of them to be funny, but my 5 top ones, be they negative or positive were these ones, of course #1 being my favorite, this person KNOWS REALITY:

  1. Yeah. But until this place gets gentrified, this is going to to be the ghettoest chipotle to exist.
  2. Yay white bitches in the hood
  3. They always gonna run out of chicken
  4. Trash ass food
  5. That’s what they’re putting there?! There’s already an overpriced Taco Bell across the street!

 

 

And here are some of the “doomsday” Facebook comments:

they really making jamaica white again smh

There ain’t no downtown Jamaica

Downtown Jamaica ?🤔🤔 Its Called The Ave

First Starbucks now we getting chipotle to ? 😭

I knew it son I was like they either gonna put a shake shack or chipotle 🤦🏾‍♀️

OOOOOHHH IT’S OVER

DOWNTOWN JAMAICA 😂😂😂😂😂😂

They “downtown ing ” everything right?

Gentrification on the way

The Regentrification of Jamaica Centre, Jamaica has already begun. First Starbucks now Chipotle! Hmmmmm!

opened a Starbucks and now this, I peep the game now

Downtown added to anything other than manhattan means “gentrification, coming to a hood near you”

oh man remember when we used to joke about a chipotle on the ave…it’s really happening 😩😩😩😩

The part that’s killling me is they said downtown Jamaica.
They shutting Down The Ave
Nah the Dallas BBQs that’s going to be on parsons is going to shut down the Ave

Stop trying to gentrify Jamaica Queens.

Just stop. 🙄🙄

Downtown Jamaica. Stoppppp

Tf is going on here

Gentrification

Yeah. But until this place gets gentrified, this is going to to be the ghettoest chipotle to exist.

If they add a chik fila it’s gonna get noticeably gentrified real quick

 

Gentrification. They trynna fix the area up so more white people will invest in it and push the minority’s out

 

If I see one more post abt down town Jamaica. Mother fucker this isn’t manhattan it’s called the fucking ave dick heads. On another note cool chipotle gone be over there. Still another sign of gentrification

 

Right lmao tryna make it sound sophisticated n shit

 

The bar is set high as to the people who live there set it high enough to be gentrified no? so please STFU… when it comes to knowing what is bad and what is good for a community…last time I checked the places that had Chipotle or a trader joes…there was less and less black folk to be found… so shove all that 1…

A FEW NOTES OF ACTUAL GOOD JAMAICA INTERESTS: THE 6TH ANNUAL JAMAICA BALL, THE THIRD ANNUAL JAMAICA RESTAURANT CRAWL, FREE TENNIS LESSONS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE & EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES AT DALLAS BBQ

A few notes of interest, not related to garbage, crime, crooked & do nothing elected officials and other typical Jamaica ghetto bullshit and nonsense.

The Jamaica Ball still has tickets for tonight’s event (5.20.17). Went a few years ago and it was a good time, although you have to see some of the smiling bullshit artists known as “our elected officials” there. But for a worthy cause. Presented by A Better Jamaica run by Greg Mays, one of the upstanding players in our community and overall good guy.

The Third Annual Jamaica Crawl and certainly some good restaurants on the list. Sangria happens to be one of my favorites, not just in Jamaica either and O’Lavrador is an old school restaurant with good food and a very friendly nice bar next door.

 

 

Free tennis lessons at Detective Keith Williams Park (too bad this nice park has to sit across from that polluting, poisnous Royal Waste Dump. Time to DUMP that business the hell out of here.

JOBS. For those who complain “our young kids have no jobs, so that is why the hangout” bullshit. APPLY. Sure it might not be the best paying job around, but if you are good, you certainly can make nice tips if you are a wait stuff. Just make sure to check your crappy Jamaica attitude at the door.

CHIPOTLE PLANNING TO OPEN IN DOWNTOWN JAMAICA ON THE AVE

Whoa, first a Starbucks on Sutphin Blvd and THEN Jamaica Ave, now a Chipolte across the street and a Burlington Coat Factor and H&M next door and Dallas BBQ on Parsons in the old City Rib/Moda Grill spot.

While this may not sound to some people as such a big deal, but considering all the damn crap that has been on Jamaica Ave for decades, this is something. I have been in the Starbucks in both places and both have good customer service (most businesses here need to take a course in 101 customer service) and are always nice inside (but I would expect that from them). While I rarely go to Starbucks (their coffee sucks), at least they have standards and pay their people decent with benefits.

Now a big questions, will that bring in better quality of people into the community to shop, etc or live and will the powers that be really do something about cleaning up all the fucking garbage and the nonsense that tends to go on too much. Hell, if this can all help move out the polluting Royal Waste, shoot for the stars, but don’t pull a LIC or some Brooklyn shit, just make it a nice affordable community with hard working people who actually have pride in their community, treat it with respect and want nice things in their community, so they don’t have to always go outside the hood and dump money into some other community. Of course there will those that will scream “gentrification” or “there goes the neighborhood” or “come the white people”, etc, the kind of people who are content with all the bullshit and nonsense because they cause the bullshit and nonsense and this may put a cramp in their style and maybe even learn to be civilized and be respectful.

In the meantime, I feel this is good news, but the bad news, when it opens, Comrie and his crew will be front and center in front of it for “their close-up.”

———————————————–.————

From DNAInfo New York:

Chipotle Planning to Open New Outpost in Downtown Jamaica

By Ewa Kern-Jedrychowska | May 19, 2017 4:26pm

 Chipotle is planning to open a new restaurant at 160-02 Jamaica Ave. 

Chipotle is planning to open a new restaurant at 160-02 Jamaica Ave.

Chipotle/Facebook

QUEENS — Mexican fast-food chain Chipotle is planning to open its first eatery in downtown Jamaica, according to the company.

The outpost will be located at 160-02 Jamaica Ave., Chipotle spokesman Chris Arnold said in an email Friday.

Arnold also noted that “construction is not yet scheduled, so it’s too soon to offer any guidance on timing.”

The restaurant will open as part of a retail complex — which will also include Burlington Coat Factory and H&M — located one block away from the Jamaica Center subway station and across the street from Starbucks, which opened at 159-27 Jamaica Ave. in March.

Chipotle is planning to open its new restaurant at 160-02 Jamaica Ave. (DNAinfo/Ewa Kern-Jedrychowska)

The chain currently has five locations in Queens — in the Rego Center Mall in Rego Park, in the Queens Center Mall in Elmhurst, on Austin Street in Forest Hills, on Northern Boulevard in Jackson Heights and on Jackson Avenue in Long Island City.

“I’m so excited that they are coming,” said Valerie Stevens, director of business services and operations at the Jamaica Center Business Improvement District. “I’ve been wanting Chipotle for a long time on Jamaica Avenue and I think it’s going to be really good for businesses and it’s definitely going to increase the foot traffic in downtown Jamaica.”

The chain is coming to the neighborhood as it’s been undergoing a rapid transformation, with a slew of new apartment buildings, hotels and stores.

Earlier this month, Dallas BBQ also confirmed that it’s planning to open a new eatery at 89-14 Parsons Blvd. in downtown Jamaica this summer.

MONTH OF JUNE IS “GET TO KNOW YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD COMMUNITY OFFICERS” & HELP PUT A STOP TO THE DAMN NONSENSE IN THE JAMAICA COMMUNITY

What a GREAT program folks, so damn it, USE IT, instead of just complaining among yourselves. Get to know your “Neighborhood Community Officers” in your areas. They can help with so many issues (NYPD issues, so no garbage problems). Illegal truck driving on residential streets, illegal commercial truck parking, auto body shops take over of public sidewalks/streets, ice cream trucks blaring their damn jingle while parked (NOTE: ice cream trucks can only play the jingle when they are  in motion, NOT WHEN THEY ARE STOPPED, which is ILLEGAL and has high fines), loud noise such as huge speakers outside in back yards late at night or cars parked in front of your building while people hang out and blast music, Fireworks that start in this community Memorial Day and go through labor day – FIREWORKS ARE ILLEGAL IN NYC. You name a quality of life issue that pertains to NYPD, then your NCO’s can help and boy, do they get the job done. This reminds me of back in the days where the beat cops knew the people in the community and the community got to know them and they knew the good guys from the bad guys.

My two NCO’s, Officer Louis York (louis.york@nypd.org) & Officer Adam Sclafani (adam.sclafani@nypd.org) have been just amazing and have hit the ground running since the program was implemented back in October of 2016 in the 103rd. They have put a stop to the illegal truck driving on my residential street right from the get go and have been working hard on the auto body shops in the area who place junked and unlicensed vehicles up on sidewalks and on the public streets. They seem to really care about working on the quality of life issues that have plagued the area for way too long and getting to know the people in the community. And since the majority of their job is focusing on quality of life issues, they will not have to put complaints on hold to do other things. They communicate with me on a regular basis and always keep me informed of the status of my complaints and issues. I cannot praise this program enough and my NCO’s, York and Sclafani. This has been a long time coming.

So STOP BITCHING FOR THE SAKE OF BITCHING and take back your community and stop thinking that all the ghetto bullshit/nonsense is just normal for this community, because IT IS NOT. And even though our local elected officials are totally useless, have no balls, don’t stand up for the community or the constituents who put them in office, STILL file complaints with them as well, don’t let them off the hook since we pay their over-bloated salaries. BUT if you want problems to be actually addressed quickly and solved, speak to your NCO’s in your area.

Find out your area’s upcoming meetings and ATTEND THEM:

► Sector Adam (between the Van Wyck Expressway and 175th Street and between Hillside and Archer avenues) — Tuesday, June 6, at the Central Library at 89-11 Merrick Blvd.

► Sector Boy (between 175th Street and Francis Lewis Boulevard and between Hillside and Archer avenues) — Thursday, June 8, at I.S. 238 Susan B. Anthony Academy at 88-15 182 St.

► Sector Charlie (between the Van Wyck Expressway and 157th Street and between Archer and 110th avenues) — Tuesday, June 20, at the Concerned Parents of Jamaica Early Learning Center at 143-04 101 Ave.(NCO’s assigned to monitor Sutphin Boulevard will also be there).

► Sector David (between 157th Street and Francis Lewis Boulevard and between Archer and 110th avenues) — Thursday, June 15, at the South Hollis Library at 204-01 Hollis Ave. (NCO’s assigned to the South Jamaica Houses will also attend).

All meetings will begin at 7 p.m. and doors will open at 6:30 p.m.

———————————

From DNAInfo New York:

Meet Your Beat Officers at Safety Summits in Jamaica

By Ewa Kern-Jedrychowska | May 16, 2017 8:25am

 Neighborhood Coordination Officers giving out toys to kids at the South Jamaica Houses earlier this year.

Neighborhood Coordination Officers giving out toys to kids at the South Jamaica Houses earlier this year.View Full Caption

103rd Precinct/Twitter

QUEENS — Jamaica residents will soon get to discuss a variety of problems they would like to see fixed in their neighborhood during a series of “Safety Summit Meetings” with officers assigned to monitor specific areas of the precinct, police officials said.

Eight of the “neighborhood coordination officers,” or NCOs, have been assigned to four newly created patrol sectors in the 103rd Precinct, where they work all their shifts, getting to know local residents and business owners, as part of a new community policing program which was introduced in the 103rd Precinct in October.

Six additional NCOs were also assigned to monitor the South Jamaica Houses, Jamaica Avenue and Sutphin Boulevard.

When the program, seeking to improve the relationship between the community and the police department, was introduced to the area last year, the 103rd Precinct immediately saw a significant drop in overall crime numbers, officials said.

The officers have since met with local residents during various community events and informal meetings, as well as during the monthly 103rd Precinct Community Council meeting.

But this time, meetings with the NCOs will be organized in each of the four sectors in order to discuss crime and quality of life issues related to each of the specific areas, police officials said.

“They are going to be speaking about issues in the sector where they work and everybody who lives there is welcome to come, work with the NCOs, come up with issues and ideas about how to fix the problem,” said Inspector John Cappelmann, the commanding officer of the 103rd Precinct, during a recent community council meeting.

Check the complete schedule of the upcoming meetings with the Jamaica NCOs below: 

► Sector Adam (between the Van Wyck Expressway and 175th Street and between Hillside and Archer avenues) — Tuesday, June 6, at the Central Library at 89-11 Merrick Blvd.

► Sector Boy (between 175th Street and Francis Lewis Boulevard and between Hillside and Archer avenues) — Thursday, June 8, at I.S. 238 Susan B. Anthony Academy at 88-15 182 St.

► Sector Charlie (between the Van Wyck Expressway and 157th Street and between Archer and 110th avenues) — Tuesday, June 20, at the Concerned Parents of Jamaica Early Learning Center at 143-04 101 Ave.(NCO’s assigned to monitor Sutphin Boulevard will also be there).

► Sector David (between 157th Street and Francis Lewis Boulevard and between Archer and 110th avenues) — Thursday, June 15, at the South Hollis Library at 204-01 Hollis Ave. (NCO’s assigned to the South Jamaica Houses will also attend).

All meetings will begin at 7 p.m. and doors will open at 6:30 p.m.

 

From The Daily News:

EXCLUSIVE: For first time NYPD program will connect communities to their sector rank-and-file officers

Mayor Bill de Blasio, left, and Police Commissioner James O’Neill. “This gives people the chance to give us feedback in regularly scheduled meetings,” O’Neill told the Daily News.

(James Keivom/New York Daily News)

The NYPD will announce on Tuesday a program that promises to bring cops closer to the people they serve — allowing rank-and-file officers for the first time to hold community meetings in the sectors they patrol.Police officials say the seemingly simple plan represents a radical change in the normally buttoned-up NYPD culture.Four pilot meetings were held in March, but the quarterly informal gatherings begin in earnest in the 44th Precinct in the Bronx. There are 166 more meetings on tap through July in the 43 precincts that now have neighborhood coordination officers, or NCOs.“We’ve been talking about building trust,” Police Commissioner James O’Neill told the Daily News. “This gives people the chance to give us feedback in regularly scheduled meetings. It’s also important to show the cops that we respect them and trust them.”

Left to right, Monique Porter, Center Director of the PAL Wynn Center on Gates Avenue, Police Officer John Buchanan and Police Officer Robert Bramble outside the 79th Precinct station house in Brooklyn.

(Gardiner Anderson/for New York Daily News)

Eventually every police command in the city will have the meetings with the goals of improving community ties, addressing quality-of-life issues and solving crime. And precinct bosses — they promise — won’t be there breathing down patrol officers’ necks, Chief of Patrol Terence Monahan said.

“We’re trying to reach out to get the population who lives there and works there to show up and interact with our cops,” he said. “It’s all about humanizing them — humanizing the community and humanizing our cops.”

The program is a change from the Precinct Community Council system that has been the NYPD model dating to the 1950s, in which precinct commanders hold monthly meetings.

 A drawback to the old model is that most precincts have populations the size of small cities, and the commanders can’t possibly address every issue that comes up.

“Before, I think it was popular to paint us all with one brush, but allowing people to interact and get to know their officers personally lets people know all officers are not the same,” Officer Bramble said.

(Gardiner Anderson/for New York Daily News)

Each sector has a more manageable average of 28,000 people in it — with the largest on the Upper East Side with 81,000 people and the smallest in Midtown North with 1,700 people, said NYPD adviser John Linder. He called the meetings a “cultural transformation” that will give cops more discretion and increase public trust.

“We’re taking a big situation and making it smaller and easier to analyze and oversee,” said Assistant Chief Rodney Harrison, operational commander of the NCO program. “Instead of having one meeting, now there are four or five. Rather than top-down, it’s going right to the same persons who are going to solve the problem.”

About 50 people attended the first pilot meeting at 44th Precinct in March, and 20 to 30 people showed up at the other three. Officials believe smaller crowds are actually better because they make it easier for people to interact.

“You’ll have some precincts where more people will come than others, but you’ve got to start somewhere,” O’Neill said. “When people see they will have real input into what’s going on in the meetings, we think the turnout will increase.”

The NCO program, which began in four precincts in May 2015, is already having an effect. As of May 7, shootings were down 18.9% in the precincts with the programs, down to 180 from 222 in 2016. Shootings in the rest of the precincts are up by two cases.

Citywide, the number of shootings is down by 17.7% — 225 this year compared to 265 last year — meaning that NCO precincts are driving the decline.

The NCO program is now in more than half the city’s commands, including housing commands. The program aims to link cops and members of the community to reduce crime.

Still, Harrison and Monahan said selling the meeting program to some commanders has been a challenge.

“Compstat at one point was a way of evaluating your performance,” Harrison said. “And if you’re an old school executive, that’s still kind of stuck in your mind. We’re not going in that direction anymore, so that’s one of the biggest struggles.”

“We’re able to sit here and have a conversation with you,” Officer Buchanan said. “It’s the village concept coming back,” said Monique Porter.

(Gardiner Anderson/for New York Daily News)

The launch of the sector meeting program will correspond with an ad campaign funded by the Police Foundation.

Software executive Charles Phillips, a member of the Police Foundation Board, said the multimillion ad campaign was necessary to draw people to the meeting.

“We thought that getting the word out was critical,” Phillips, 57, said. “The culture is changing and moving forward. It’s very good for the city.”

Meetings will be listed on the buildtheblock.nyc website starting Tuesday.

“For years, I don’t think our cops were able to use their discretion to solve problems on their own,” Monahan said. “This is about us as a department allowing our cops to kind of finally have this role and prove to them that we’re not kidding.”

The cops are judged by their sector crime numbers. Commanders also hold them accountable for how well they deal with problems the community brings them.

For NCO Officers John Buchanan and Robert Bramble, both 25 and assigned to the 79th Precinct in Brooklyn, the program is helping change the perception of the cops.

“Before, I think it was popular to paint us all with one brush, but allowing people to interact and get to know their officers personally lets people know all officers are not the same,” Bramble said.

“We’re able to sit here and have a conversation with you,” Buchanan said. “That was unheard of when we first started.”

The cops participated in one of the pilot meetings in March, and found it useful, as did Monique Porter, 48, director of the Bedford-Stuyvesant Police Athletic League.

“It’s the village concept coming back,” she said. “They wanted to hear what was going on and they were able to hone in on the issues. If someone was talking about a crime, they would know the street they were talking about. They knew people there. They are really reaching out.”