THE “CHIPOTLE ARMEGEDDON” STILL CONTINUES AND THE BEST COMMENT ON WHY JAMAICA AVENUE SHOULD HAVE A CHIPOTLE

Who knew that the mention of a Chipotle coming to Jamaica could get some people in a damn tizzy (https://cleanupjamaicaqueens.wordpress.com/2017/05/21/reality-check-folks-chipotle-coming-to-the-ave-is-not-the-end-of-the-world-or-gentrification-it-is-just-a-fucking-chipolte-a-couple-of-notches-above-taco-bell-not-some-fancy-5-star-french/). Wish there was this much reaction to the garbage strewn, nonsense mess that is what Jamaica seems to be about (which is one reason for the development), but that, not a peep from the crew, but attempts at improving this ghetto run down area just slightly has hood rat panties in an uproar.

Since I posted this, on the Clean Up Jamaica Queens Facebook Page, 1,258 folks were reached, 3,312 had reactions, comments & shares combined with 756 comments on the shared. Damn, it is a Chipotle, not a cure for cancer or the end of the world. Even though there were plenty of negative comments (mostly from the young crew), overall, the majority of people found this new bit of info in a positive light, even though some people seemed to be more stuck on the term “Downtown Jamaica” as opposed to the hood phrase, “The Ave”, which I have not heard it called that since I moved here several years ago. BUT get over a damn name folks, before some of you coined it the ghetto “The Ave”, back in the pre-garbage strewn days it was just Jamaica Avenue before it became ghettoized.

But speaking of shared comments, this happened to be the best one on Clean Up Jamaica Queens Facebook on WHY we should have a Chipotle here in Jamaica, Downtown Jamaica, Jamaica Avenue, The Ave or DoJam.

Sight of the new Chipotle in Jamaica at corner of Jamaica Avenue & 160 Street

I mean… I’m biased in this situation because Chipotle is my everything. But, what is a Downtown Jamaica? #SouthsideJamaicaQueens  In addition, call me oblivious, but what is wrong with a little gentrification? So, you guys would really rather have FOUR stripper shoe stores than 3 stripper shoe stores and a Chipotle?  I’m just saying .

REALITY CHECK FOLKS: CHIPOTLE COMING TO “THE AVE” IS NOT THE END OF THE WORLD OR “GENTRIFICATION”, IT IS JUST A FUCKING CHIPOLTE, A COUPLE OF NOTCHES ABOVE TACO BELL, NOT SOME FANCY 5 STAR FRENCH RESTAURANT – GET OVER IT

OH MY FUCKING GOD.  While my recent post about the opening of Chipotle in downtown Jamaica (that some hate that term) on the Ave  (https://cleanupjamaicaqueens.wordpress.com/2017/05/19/chipotle-planning-to-open-in-downtown-jamaica-on-the-ave/) had many liking that idea, there were, of course (it’s Jamaica), those who thought a 5 star fancy French Restaurant with valet parking was coming and that it was the end for Jamaica and major gentrification. One commented “They shutting Down The Ave

REALITY CHECK FOLKS, it is only a fucking Chipotle. A CHIPOTLE, owned by McDonald’s and a two notches above Taco Bell and a notch below AppleBee’s. Probably the same folks who were outraged that how dare an Applebee’s come into the  hood and ruin “The Ave” and all it’s crappiness.

That “Chipotle Armageddon” post on Clean Up Jamaica Queens Facebook page was shared like crazy and some of the Jamaica residents (mostly young) thought it was Armageddon Gentrification.  Many also hated the term “Downtown Jamaica”, which, was a term I coined when I first moved here to Jamaica, because, well, it is the business district with businesses, etc, so I would call it that, then down the road, I noticed the powers that be and developers were using it all the time. Again, get over the use of that, I mean it is a downtown area, small, but a downtown area, never the less. I am partial to “The Ave”, much hipper and cooler, so maybe you don’t want that because then you will notice developers and greedy real estate agency saying “Great apartment location and just a few blocks from  THE AVE, where you can work & play.”

This was one of the top highest posts since this blog was created, with the “Chipotle Armageddon” reaching 1,019 and 1,957 (readers, comments & shares). While as can be seen, most liked it, there were of course the ones, who cannot stand to see any type of positive progress in Jamaica and look at it as “gentrification”, which when you think about it is a sad state of mentality with some people here, they would be content to see Jamaica continue as a trashed, crime ridden, nonsense, crap retail/food ghetto place. While there are some things I like about the area and I do like that real urban feel (as compared to fake hipster cool), the area does need cleaning up and some sprucing here and there and that means some nice places to balance out the crap like 99 cent stores, cheap electronic stores, tons of beauty supply stores, crappy food choices and flea market type retail.

Anyway, I had to post some of the comments where folks were in an outrage and I found some of them to be funny, but my 5 top ones, be they negative or positive were these ones, of course #1 being my favorite, this person KNOWS REALITY:

  1. Yeah. But until this place gets gentrified, this is going to to be the ghettoest chipotle to exist.
  2. Yay white bitches in the hood
  3. They always gonna run out of chicken
  4. Trash ass food
  5. That’s what they’re putting there?! There’s already an overpriced Taco Bell across the street!

 

 

And here are some of the “doomsday” Facebook comments:

they really making jamaica white again smh

There ain’t no downtown Jamaica

Downtown Jamaica ?🤔🤔 Its Called The Ave

First Starbucks now we getting chipotle to ? 😭

I knew it son I was like they either gonna put a shake shack or chipotle 🤦🏾‍♀️

OOOOOHHH IT’S OVER

DOWNTOWN JAMAICA 😂😂😂😂😂😂

They “downtown ing ” everything right?

Gentrification on the way

The Regentrification of Jamaica Centre, Jamaica has already begun. First Starbucks now Chipotle! Hmmmmm!

opened a Starbucks and now this, I peep the game now

Downtown added to anything other than manhattan means “gentrification, coming to a hood near you”

oh man remember when we used to joke about a chipotle on the ave…it’s really happening 😩😩😩😩

The part that’s killling me is they said downtown Jamaica.
They shutting Down The Ave
Nah the Dallas BBQs that’s going to be on parsons is going to shut down the Ave

Stop trying to gentrify Jamaica Queens.

Just stop. 🙄🙄

Downtown Jamaica. Stoppppp

Tf is going on here

Gentrification

Yeah. But until this place gets gentrified, this is going to to be the ghettoest chipotle to exist.

If they add a chik fila it’s gonna get noticeably gentrified real quick

 

Gentrification. They trynna fix the area up so more white people will invest in it and push the minority’s out

 

If I see one more post abt down town Jamaica. Mother fucker this isn’t manhattan it’s called the fucking ave dick heads. On another note cool chipotle gone be over there. Still another sign of gentrification

 

Right lmao tryna make it sound sophisticated n shit

 

The bar is set high as to the people who live there set it high enough to be gentrified no? so please STFU… when it comes to knowing what is bad and what is good for a community…last time I checked the places that had Chipotle or a trader joes…there was less and less black folk to be found… so shove all that 1…

HERE WE GO AGAIN WITH DOWNTOWN JAMAICA “THE NEXT HOT SPOT” COMPARING JAMAICA TO THE NEXT ATLANTIC YARDS – REALLY

Take this bullshit with a grain of salt, considering where is it coming from, “Hotel Business”. Do I believe Jamaica will some day change, probably, but that is way way down the road, way down the road.

Since this article tends to focus on hotel growth, I did not see mentioned the numerous hotels in Jamaica that have been turned into homeless shelters including the Ramada Inn on Hillside Ave and 164th which is a hybrid of hotel and homeless shelter, where recently a man with a machete held his wife and kids living in the “homeless section” hostage for several hours.

In the article:

Hope Knight, president & CEO, GJDC, stressed how important multiple hotels are. “Before GJDC, I was COO of Upper Manhattan Empowerment Zone,” she explained. “We spent a lot of time trying to create a hotel market. When I talked to hotel industry experts, they said we needed to have four or five hotels to really create a hub. What’s exciting about Jamaica is there is going to be a hub, and each of those hotels will feed upon each other.”

Hotel Industry Experts, really, there is a name for hotel developers now and that Jamaica needs four or five. NEWSFLASH, we have several that have been turned into homeless shelters and the LIRR Hub at Sutphin and Archer is a hotbed of druggies, criminal activity, homeless and drug dealers, not too mention the beautiful retail choices in the area. GIVE ME A FUCKING BREAK Hope. I know you need to do your job, but my asshole can only take so much fucking bullshit smoke up it.

Also in the article:

Rob MacKay, director of public relations, marketing & tourism, Queens Economic Development Corp., noted that Jamaica could be very much like Long Island City. MacKay stressed the importance of safety. “Jamaica is safer than it’s been in my lifetime.” Xu agreed, calling it a family neighborhood.

And let me guess, Rob MacKay does not live in Jamaica.

Okay need to head to the bathroom to relieve all this bullshit smoke that is clogging me up.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m8PCHRMJ23Y

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From Hotel Business:

Is Downtown Jamaica, Queens, the next hot spot?

Tuesday December 15th, 2015 – 2:48PM

JAMAICA, NY—Travel guide publisher Lonely Planet named Queens County the No. 1 Best in the U.S. 2015 destination to visit, which is reflected in the reinvention of neighborhoods like Long Island City and Flushing. But, will Downtown Jamaica soon join them?

Dena Libner, director of communications & external affairs, NYC & Company, put this into perspective for attendees at a recent meeting of the members of Greater Jamaica Development Corporation (GJDC), a nonprofit that plans and advances responsible development to revitalize Jamaica. “Brooklyn was named Lonely Planet’s top U.S. destination in 2005, and we all know the development and extraordinary growth that happened the decade after that,” she said. “It’s a precursor.”

Arthur Fefferman, president, AFC Realty Capital, Inc., agreed with Libner’s assessment. “The forecast is Jamaica will be the next Atlantic Yards [the development in Brooklyn that was renamed Pacific Park and includes the Barclays Center and Long Island Rail Road’s Atlantic Terminal],” he said.

Certainly, hotel development is currently happening in Downtown Jamaica. According to GJDC, not long ago, this neighborhood was home to fewer than 400 hotel rooms; now, there are almost 2,000 rooms in various stages of development. “The borough of Queens is the most active hotel market outside of Manhattan, according to STR,” said Justin Rodgers, managing director, real estate and economic development, GJDC. “In Downtown Jamaica, there are currently six properties in operation for a total of 409 rooms. In the new-construction pipeline for hotels, there are 10 hotels planned in the next year, which will produce 1,953 rooms.”

Last May, a 74-room Comfort Inn opened between Jamaica and 89th Aves. That month, developer Chris Xu also started construction on a 16-story, dual-branded Marriott Courtyard and Fairfield Inn & Suites. He is also planning a SpringHill Suites on Queens Blvd. Ampiera Group is expected to begin construction later this year on a 179,000-sq.-ft. mixed-use project that includes a 242-key hotel. In July, Able Management teamed up with AFC Realty Capital to develop a $54-million, 24-story, 225-room Hilton Garden Inn, which will break ground soon.

According to GJDC, there are several other projects in various stages of planning: a 155-key Four Points by Sheraton; a 49-key Sleep Inn; a 283-key property, as well as a 48-key hotel and an 85-key hotel that have both yet to be branded, all from Pride Hospitality Group; and a site with three hotels—a Wyndham Garden, a La Quinta Inn & Suites and a Country Inn & Suites—from developer Chandresh Patel.

Hope Knight, president & CEO, GJDC, stressed how important multiple hotels are. “Before GJDC, I was COO of Upper Manhattan Empowerment Zone,” she explained. “We spent a lot of time trying to create a hotel market. When I talked to hotel industry experts, they said we needed to have four or five hotels to really create a hub. What’s exciting about Jamaica is there is going to be a hub, and each of those hotels will feed upon each other.”

“Having three or four hotels is much better than having one hotel because it creates a critical mass,” agreed Fefferman. “It brings more people, shopping and restaurants.”

Fefferman noted that the redevelopment of Downtown Jamaica is a coming together of a number of forces that were years in the making. “Nothing of any significance got developed, and the primary reason is land control. It was all small, individual parcels, no major ownership,” he said. “The second reason is the zoning. There was no comprehensive zoning plan that provided for high-density development. As a result, you couldn’t do anything of significance around Jamaica Station.”

Fefferman credited GJDC for helping to solve both problems. “Greater Jamaica obtained land control of significant parcels around the station and conducted an RFP for developers to come in with their proposals as to what they will develop,” he said. GJDC also joined with the LIRR, the Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) and the Port Authority to get approval for a master plan that “allows for high-density development, much in the same way as what happened at Atlantic Yards in Brooklyn,” he said.

Though development is happening, Knight doesn’t foresee gentrification in Jamaica. “When you look at the parcels that are being developed, in most cases, you didn’t have residents living at those locations, so there aren’t people being moved out,” she said.

Both Xu and Fefferman also noted that land costs in Jamaica are significantly cheaper than Manhattan, though the former said development costs are comparable. Xu also noted that many of the developments are connected to major brands, which will help the properties. “I’m building Marriott hotels,” he said. “Courtyard, Fairfield and SpringHill Suites are good brands.”

Xu highlighted the importance of transportation. “The reason I’m building hotels in Downtown Jamaica is, with the transportation, it’s very convenient,” he said, noting that its 3.5 miles to JFK International Airport with access on the AirTrain, and 20 minutes to Manhattan on the LIRR. “There’s also the subways,” he said. “It’s very good for the hotel business.”

Fefferman agreed. “After Grand Central and Penn Station, Jamaica is the third most important transportation hub in the New York metro area,” he said. “For example, the Hilton Garden feasibility is strong because you now have a hotel right at the transportation center that allows you to be at the terminals within 15 minutes. It’s more convenient in many ways than actually staying at any of the hotels near JFK itself.” According to GJDC, the area has seen an increase in subway and AirTrain ridership. In 2014, 6.5 million people rode the AirTrain to/from Jamaica Station, up 18% from the 5.5 million users in 2011.

Additionally, Downtown Jamaica is seeing other kinds of development as well. BRP Companies is building The Crossing, which will consist of 100,000 sq. ft. of retail and community facilities, and 580 units of mixed income affordable housing. It is expected to be complete by Q1 2018. Knight highlighted the importance of this. “Amenities such as shops, restaurants and other entertainment venues are crucial to attract hotel visitors to the area,” she said.

All agreed that Jamaica would likely see international guests with a longer length of stay looking for a more affordable price than Manhattan hotels. “Citywide ADR averages were $295 in 2014,” said Rodgers. “Currently, here in Downtown Jamaica, they’re about $130.”

Rob MacKay, director of public relations, marketing & tourism, Queens Economic Development Corp., noted that Jamaica could be very much like Long Island City. “Their market is mostly long-term stay, and a lot of them are coming because [Long Island City is] only one subway stop from Manhattan but we are about $150 cheaper a night,” he said. “If you’re staying five or six nights, that’s a lot of money. Jamaica hotels will probably be a little bit cheaper than Long Island City.”

Libner also stressed the guest’s desire for authentic neighborhoods. “For international visitors who are here longer, they want to see more of the city, so they go to what they deem to be the way New Yorkers live,” she said. “On a second visit, they’re even more likely to do so. That growing interest in experiencing a destination the way locals [do] pushes visitors beyond Manhattan.”

MacKay stressed the importance of safety. “Jamaica is safer than it’s been in my lifetime.” Xu agreed, calling it a family neighborhood.

Knight pointed to the Jamaica Now Action Plan, which the city announced last April. It outlines 21 strategic actions for the revitalization and growth of Jamaica, by providing workforce training and small business support, initiating new mixed-use development anchored by affordable housing, and improving the livability of the neighborhood through investments in safety measures, green spaces and more. The actions, 16 of which will be launched and implemented in the next three years, represent approximately $153 million in current public funding.

“Many of the projects are going to support this hotel development,” said Knight. “Ones like the marketing and branding campaign are certainly going to support the hotel development effort; investment in infrastructure around the station area is going to help make improvements to the pedestrian experience and [make it] more friendly to visitors.”

“Part of the plan of the city calls for some streetscaping, landscaping, lighting and high security to make it very attractive,” agreed Fefferman. “That’s what the new Jamaica is all about.”

However, he noted that one of the area’s biggest hurdles is “getting people to recognize the old Jamaica to the new Jamaica,” he said. “That all comes with having the infrastructure and development in place. People have a perception of Jamaica, but that’s it’s easy to change that.”

“There is a tremendous amount of development activity happening in this community on a very large scale. It will be a compelling destination given its access to the airport and the transportation options,” concluded Knight. “I believe that Jamaica is a community in tremendous transition. It’s in the early cycle of revitalization, and a neighborhood rich in ethnic and economic diversity. HB

—Nicole Carlino

 

MONDAY, MARCH 20 @ 6PM DOWNTOWN HARVEST ROOM – DOWNTOWN JAMAICA TRANSPORTATION STUDY PUBLIC MEETING – YET AGAIN, BUT DOES ANYTHING CHANGE OR JUST MORE SMOKE BLOWN UP YOUR ASS

If you can attend, come March 20th and be prepared to have massive amounts of smoke blown up your ass by Department of Transportation. I attended this same thing back in 2015 and brought up issues of illegal truck driving on residential streets and the need for signs to be posted on problematic areas, poor conditions of roads in the downtown area, especially 89th Ave from 169 to Parsons Blvd (and Parsons) and other issues, that to this day are still fucking problems. I will plan on attending and to be in rare form.

They do have eats there though, at least they did last time I went.

—————————–

Downtown Jamaica Transportation Study: Public Meeting

March 20 @ 6:00 pm8:00 pm

Free

THURSDAY NIGHT JAZZ EVERY 2ND THURSDAY AT THE JAMAICA CENTER FOR ARTS AND LEARNING – BUT WILL THE JAMAICA BRAIN & CULTURE DEAD EVEN SUPPORT IT

I try to promote what little positive Jamaica has to offer, but I am sorry, a majority of the people living here do not appreciate this like those in Brooklyn do. They prefer third world & ghetto CRAP.

Here is what the executive director of JCAL had to say:

This series is designed in response to the demand for a nightlife to return to downtown Jamaica,” says Cathy Hung, Executive Director of JCAL. “We want to bring the vibrant Queens Jazz scene to downtown Jamaica and build an audience for the culture that lives right here.” 

Well, I have to question that statement BIG TIME. The series was designed in response to the demands for a nightlife to return to downtown Jamaica. I really want to know what demand. I mean we had a great hangout with decent food, good drinks and live jazz in a great sitting, does City Rib ring a bell or it’s replacement Moda Grill. Two years for City Rib, maybe three before it closed due to a lack of support and maybe a year for Moda Grill. JCAL also used to have First Fridays, a monthly Friday event at the center with local food, music, art, etc, I don’t think that lasted a year. So exactly where is the demand. I mean it is pretty sad that a place like City Rib right in downtown could not even make it to 5 years.

Well, at least I give some cred for trying in this wasteland known as Jamaica. But even I will not longer go to any of these things in Jamaica because I have to walk past garbage & filth, homeless shelters, homeless people, bad acting ghetto people plus that shit hole called Jamaica Avenue with all the crap retail, food places and other junk makes me want to throw up. Until the place is clean up and civilized, this whole wrapping shit up in a pretty wrapping paper and pretty bow does not cut it for us civilized folks. No thanks, we are happy to spend our hard earned money in more civilized cleaner areas. In the meantime…………………………

Image result for throw up

But put in another 99 cent store, some shitty electronic stores with junk, a crappy fried chicken shack or another beauty and supply store and SWEET JESUS.

Image result for crappy fried chicken shack on hillside ave

169-10 Hillside Avenue. Happily this shit closed some years ago.

It’s the people!!!!

——————————————-

Thursday Night Jazz:

Nat Adderley Jr. Trio  

January 12, 2017
8:30pm
Every 2nd Thursday
Suggested Donation $10
RSVP Here>>
JCAL proudly announces its 2016-2017 Thursday Night Jazz series featuring young, emerging, and established artists in all jazz genres.
Jamaica Center for Arts and Learning (JCAL) will be hosting live jazz performances on every 2nd Thursday featuring emerging and established jazz musicians and their friends. “This series is designed in response to the demand for a nightlife to return to downtown Jamaica,” says Cathy Hung, Executive Director of JCAL. “We want to bring the vibrant Queens Jazz scene to downtown Jamaica and build an audience for the culture that lives right here.”
JCAL invites renowned New York Jazz drummer Pheeroan akLaff to curate this series. Known as a versatile drummer who has mostly been associated with the avant-garde, Pheeroan akLaff has appeared with some of the more adventurous jazz musicians of the past 20 years. He said, “Musicians build bridges with creative improvisation, in this series, I want to plant a seed for community dialogue – style and trend are insignificant, stage and audience are not divided. There is nothing like being in the jazz mix at JCAL.”

Nat Adderley Jr., the scion of a famed

jazz family, grew up in Teaneck, New Jersey. He earned a degree in African American studies from Yale University, and spent much of his musical career as a music arranger for the late Luther Vandross, continuing to work with Vandross until the end of Vandross’ career in 2003. Since then, Adderley has returned to his jazzroots, performing his own works as well as tributes to his father, uncle, and selected jazz masters.
   

Upcoming: February 9, 2017
Jun Miyak and Delehei- Jazz and World Music of Mongolia

MORE SUPPORTIVE HOUSING IN DOWNTOWN JAMAICA: REALLY, THIS IS HOW YOU REVITALIZE THE AREA – MORE MENTALLY ILL, MORE HOMELESS, MORE LOW-CLASS FROM OTHER AREAS

Don’t let the phrase “supportive housing” fool you, it is pretty much a term for permanent homeless shelters for the mentally ill, homeless and then the very low-class folks.

Like Jamaica does not have enough supportive housing, homeless shelters, bottom of the barrel slobs, ghetto hood rats and other problematic people, we have to have more here. A 7 story, 44 unit supportive housing is going up in the downtown area at 88-39 163rd Street, which is only a few blocks from the big homeless shelter on 89th Ave, The El Camino, which has been problematic since it opened up there with garbage, bad behavior and other nonsense from the population that lives there and the Monica House in the next block of the El Camino.

According to the article, thirty-three of the units will be designated for patients of the organization’s mental health program and 11 will rent at below-market rates to individuals from Queens.

Great, just what the area needs more mentally ill people living here, walking around like the walking dead and below market rate apartments to individuals from Queens, not even Jamaica, but all over. The apartments are all studios (471 square feet), telling me that these will all be single men (or women), more than likely homeless and mentally ill. Notice this is not going into Forest Hills or Rego Park or Long Island City. Now if this is properly run, proper security, okay, but I don’t trust these places, especially if they are like the shit load that is already here and run poorly and problematic.

GREAT REVITALIZATION. More crap in an already crap community that the powers that be brag about revitalizing. It is called the great Jamaica Bamboozled Three Card Monte Game.

So where is Community Board 12 on this or even the local ghetto black gangsta politicians on this. SELLING YOU ALL OUT, that is where. Number one “hot neighborhood” of 2016 my ass.

Perfect time to leave this shitty area.

———————————————————

From YIMBY:

Reveal for Seven-Story, 44-Unit Supportive Residential Building Planned at 88-39 163rd Street, Jamaica

supportive-housing Upper portion of 88-39 163rd Street. Rendering via Transitional Services for New York.

The nonprofit Transitional Services for New York (TSINY) is set to break ground on Friday on a seven-story, 44-unit residential building at 88-39 163rd Street, in downtown Jamaica. Thirty-three of the units will be designated for patients of the organization’s mental health program and 11 will rent at below-market rates to individuals from Queens, DNAinfo reported. All of the units will be studios and should average 471 square feet apiece. The latest building permits indicate the new building will measure 28,210 square feet and rise 65 feet to its roof, not including bulkhead elements. Long Island City-based Amie Gross Architects is the architect of record. Completion is expected in spring 2018. A 5,266-square-foot, two-story house on the site was demolished in 2013.

supportive-housing-2Vacant 88-39 163rd Street. Image via Google Maps.

 

I COULD NOT RESIST POSTING ANOTHER ONE: QUEENS TRIBUNE ARTICLE ABOUT JAMAICA BEING SO HOT IS THE MOST BULLSHIT ARTICLE I HAVE READ AND I HAVE READ PLENTY OF BULLSHIT ARTICLES ON THE SUBJECT

Saw this and just had to do a blog post, I mean some bullshit needs to be called out on and the rag Queens Tribune needs to be called out on this major bullshit that is even low for them.

I don’t know if Samia Farah,  the director of sales at Greiner-Maltz Investment Properties, wrote this blatant bullshit and ALL LIES article about Jamaica, but if she did, she should head over to the Trump campaign (which is all bullshit) and she would be the Queen Bee of BULLSHIT there.

Let’s break this major bullshit article down:

Top reasons why Jamaica, Queens, is the hottest find today:

1. Diversity in the middle class is opening up doors to entrepreneurial business investments and ventures. BUT the lower class and the ghetto class outweigh any of the middle class that decided not to hightail it the hell out of here. Most of the businesses here are the same shit over and over, 99 cent stores, beauty supply stores (last count had about 11 just on Jamaica Ave), the mismash of crap stores that resemble third world flea markets and other assorted shit. Very few new businesses have opened that are REALLY NEW and not just another hair salon place and some of the new businesses that have opened since I have been here have since closed (City Rib, Moda Grill, Charcoal Kabab)

2. Trendy restaurants and nightlife are bringing in young professionals. Taking a cue from Trump’s disaster of a debate, WRONG! Wrong on so many accounts. There are NO TRENDY RESTAURANTS, hell, you would be hard pressed to find that many decent ones (although a few good ones stick out, just a few ). Probably the only one I would think of as “trendy” is Mirch Grill at 172-27 Hillside Avenue. Somewhat trendy and really good, but they do not serve alcohol, but have some great mocktails. So since there are NO TRENDY restaurants (AND NO NIGHTLIFE what-so-ever), there is nothing to bring young professionals here, in fact you would be hard pressed to find any young professionals. Some low-class ghetto, gangbangers, homeless, criminals, low-class third world immigrants and other assorted crap folks, but NO YOUNG PROFESSIONALS.

3. Families feel safe and welcome. Residential areas have a traditional feel with parks and schools. While not as bad as some of those way overpriced Brooklyn hot spots like Buswick/Bedstuy, Jamaica has had over a dozen people killed this year alone and countless others injured while being shot, stabbed or hit by huge tractor trailer trucks in the downtown area. Welcome, REALLY, I have been here for almost 6 years and hopefully my last and I have to say the most unfriendliest people live in Jamaica, plus they all tend to stick together with their own kind. So as far as diverse, yeah there is much diversity, but they just don’t mix it up here. Bangledeshi here, Mexicans there, Jamaicans other there, African- Americans over yonder, etc, but rarely do they all mash together like a true diverse community does. The parks are garbage strewn from the homeless encampment of Major Mark Park to the the garbage strewn Roy Wilkins Park. And the schools, THE WORSE, just ask parents.

4. It is attractive to people in all walks of life. Families, young professionals and world travelers all want to live there. NO NO NO. No want really wants to live here, they just end up here because it is so expensive everywhere else. I mean you think if I could have bought a place in Park Slope or LIC or West Village, I would have chosen ghetto Jamaica. Plus re-read the above comment, which relates to this huge lie.

5. A perfect mix of residential and commercial is key to balancing work and family life all in one location. I really have no idea what the fuck this even means, but if shitty crappy third world dwellings mixed with tons of medical facilities, drug testing places and a poisonous waste transfer station (Royal Waste) right in downtown Jamaica with their 24/7 operation of hundreds of trucks going by daily and the stench from that place, well, then I guess you can call that ghetto balance then, otherwise it is BULLSHIT.

6. Projections for future development are strong indicators that Jamaica is trending toward middle to upper-middle class. Well, this is true, but only time will tell if this happens, because right now Jamaica trends toward low-class to god awful ghetto with some middle class stuck in this nightmare of a community. But this statement does not directly relate to Jamaica, this is just a general statement about any area.

7. Investor tipping points find these particular neighborhoods still affordable enough now for a sound investment in future profits. SEE ABOVE.

8. Worldwide audiences are taking a closer look at shows like HGTV’s “Selling New York.” WHAT THE FUCK, how can I even comment on this crap.

Samia, you  have a bright future in the world of politics.

As I said I have lived here for almost 6 years and it has been a shitty 6 years of garbage, noise, poisonous waste stations, thug auto body shops that have turned Merrick Blvd into the new Willets Point, over 20 homeless shelters, dirty parks, low-class third world retail, crappy restaurants, shootings, gangs, drug dealers, poor streets & sidewalks and oh did I mention, tons of low-class ghetto people and not one damn real bakery and until Starbucks came here, not even a coffee shop.

Here is the REAL JAMAICA Ms. Farah.

ass-washingDynamic Collision4cropped-garbage-12-1-13-009.jpgTeddy and Trash7.17.16 023Teddy and Trash7.17.16 022Sutphin Garbage

Elderly man's legs are crushed by dangerous tractor trailer truck in downtown Jamaica, Friday (7.8.6) due to chronic neglect by elected officials and city agencies.

Elderly man’s legs are crushed by dangerous tractor trailer truck in downtown Jamaica, Friday (7.8.6) due to chronic neglect by elected officials and city agencies.

garbage and trucks7.1.16 018

I mean only fucking ghetto savages live like this and black communities wonder why no one respects those communities. I mean come, on look how some folks live.

I mean only fucking ghetto savages live like this and black communities wonder why no one respects those communities. I mean come, on look how some folks live.

Jamaica17

Vacant "condo" where Con Ed has put up a sign that "electricity of off due to lack of payment. Can you say ghetto B&B.

Vacant “condo” where Con Ed has put up a sign that “electricity of off due to lack of payment. Can you say ghetto B&B.

garbage 6.25.16 009garbage 6.25.16 003Garbage and Trucks6.24.16 008HeronTrucks6.19.16 011garbage6.19.16 004

This was the deli that closed a few years ago for dealing drug, guess it is opened for business again. SLOBS.

This was the deli that closed a few years ago for dealing drug, guess it is opened for business again. SLOBS.

Garbage & Cars6.18.16 075Rufus King and Crap6.11.16 051

Totally Illegal blocking of sidewalk. Pretty Girl is one of many stores on Jamaica Ave doing this. Besides making it difficult to manuever, it is low-class ghetto/third world country EYESORE.

Totally Illegal blocking of sidewalk. Pretty Girl is one of many stores on Jamaica Ave doing this. Besides making it difficult to manuever, it is low-class ghetto/third world country EYESORE.

Garbage6.11.16 039

TOTALLY FUCKING ILLEGAL & DANGEROUS. Watch crossing the streets tourists. Such trucks come from Royal Waste Services.

TOTALLY FUCKING ILLEGAL & DANGEROUS. Watch crossing the streets tourists. Such trucks come from Royal Waste Services.

Downtown Jamaica, UNACCEPTABLE

Downtown Jamaica, UNACCEPTABLE

garbage and teddy 5.7.16 007

Yes, the new symbol of Jamaica Ghetto! This in Rufus King Park.

Yes, the new symbol of Jamaica Ghetto! This in Rufus King Park.

 

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From Queens Tribune:

Wisest Choice This Season In New York Real Estate: Jamaica, Queens

on: October 06, 2016In: Real Estate Marketplace, Special Section

Samia Farah

Samia Farah

If you are looking to invest in real estate and New York looks interesting, put Jamaica, Queens, and surrounding neighborhoods at the top of your list in 2016.

Up-and-coming neighborhoods in this area are showing up in real estate industry sites like StreetEasy and sought-after real estate destination shows on HGTV. A diverse middle class is attractive to young professionals and those looking for a mix of the hottest foody spots, eclectic artwork, family-friendly parks and schools. In fact, The Wall Street Journal just named this area the hottest NYC spot this year.

Top reasons why Jamaica, Queens, is the hottest find today:

1. Diversity in the middle class is opening up doors to entrepreneurial business investments and ventures.

2. Trendy restaurants and nightlife are bringing in young professionals.

3. Families feel safe and welcome. Residential areas have a traditional feel with parks and schools.

4. It is attractive to people in all walks of life. Families, young professionals and world travelers all want to live there.

5. A perfect mix of residential and commercial is key to balancing work and family life all in one location.

6. Projections for future development are strong indicators that Jamaica is trending toward middle to upper-middle class.

7. Investor tipping points find these particular neighborhoods still affordable enough now for a sound investment in future profits.

8. Worldwide audiences are taking a closer look at shows like HGTV’s “Selling New York.”

Take a closer look, do your research and trust the experts. You will find Jamaica, Queens, to be a wise choice. Invest now while there is still room to invest.

Samia Farah is director of sales at Greiner-Maltz Investment Properties.