SOUTH JAMAICA’S FIRST NCO MEETING REVEALS PROSTITUTION, ILLEGAL AUTO SHOPS & ABANDONED VEHICLES – WELCOME TO SOUTH JAMAICA

The first NCO meeting in South Jamaica took place this recent Tuesday and residents brought up many quality of life issues including abandoned vehicles, unlicensed mechanics working on cars near people’s homes and prostitution which seems to be a big problem from 157th Street to Sutphin Blvd.

Resident Oyinade Ogunbanjo who lives at 153rd St at Tuskegee Airmen Way (formerly South Street) said “There is a guy that fixes car at the side of my house. There are three cars that have been parked there for the past two weeks. … They are occupying space that residents should have.”

Zaheer Hamid had issues with prostitution creeping up in the area. He tried to take his daughter out for ice cream one evening when he saw a call girl propositioning people for sex.The places for solicitations for sex were along 157th Street to Sutphin Boulevard, according to residents.

When I did a google search of that area, this is what popped up. HMMM, I don’ think this woman in red is waiting for a bus. It looks like we have the epitome  of South Jamaica in this photo, graffiti, vacant overgrown lot, abandon vehicle, garbage, some crappy auto/whatever place, a john and a lady of the afternoon. This photo says it all about Jamaica, especially South Jamaica.

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From Times Ledger:

Police hear Jamaica residents’ concerns

Neighborhood Community Officer Ryan Watson participates in the first NCO meeting with members of the public in Downtown Jamaica at Concerned Parents Day Care to discuss quality of life issues plaguing the area.

Officers of the 103rd Precinct held a neighborhood community meeting Tuesday on unlicensed mechanics, abandoned cars and prostitution.

In attendance at the meeting Concerned Parents Day Care, located at 143-04 on 101st Ave., was Community Board 12 Chairwoman Adrienne Adams.

 This was the first of what will be a series of quarterly meetings between officers and residents who live between 157th Street to the Van Wyck Expressway, and from 110th Avenue to Archer Avenue.

During the meeting, police and members of the public discussed how hard crime had gone down, but quality-of-life issues still plagued the region.

“This is a collaborative effort,” Officer Ian Johnson said. “You guys can work with us and you guys can work with each other to make where you live in a better place. We are going to listen to what you have to say.”

One of the major complaints for the area was about unlicensed mechanics taking up parking, forcing inhabitants who don’t have garages adjacent to their homes to walk long distances to find places for their cars.

“There is a guy that fixes car at the side of my house,” said Oyinade Ogunbanjo, who lives at 153rd Street at Tuskegee Airmen Way. “There are three cars that have been parked there for the past two weeks. … They are occupying space that residents should have.”

According to Ogunbanjo, the cars either had out-of-state license plates or no license plates at all, and the ones that were not repaired were so filthy that they attracted raccoons and stray cats.

“Illegal parking is a major problem that we have in this area,” Johnson said. “They shouldn’t be there for an excess of seven days, and when it hits that seven-day mark, it is considered to be abandoned.”

 The officers asked the residents to get in touch with the precinct and provide the location of the vehicle, the make and model of the car.

“They are getting out of hand,” Johnson said. “We need your help to pinpoint them.”

The officers also explained that they could only do so much because they have three towing companies and the parking lots they have for towed cars sometimes reach full capacity. Some of the cars, however, will be taken by the Department of Sanitation if they are considered to have no value and classified as scrap metal. The plus side is that residents no longer have to wait for 311 to respond.

Zaheer Hamid had issues with prostitution creeping up in the area. He tried to take his daughter out for ice cream one evening when he saw a call girl propositioning people for sex.The places for solicitations for sex were along 157th Street to Sutphin Boulevard, according to residents.

“We are going to do another prostitution operation,” Alexander said. “We will have an officer that is undercover calling it out [signaling the johns and prostitute­s].”

There was not a definite date given out for the operation, but “it will be at the end of June,” according to Officer Ryan Watson.

Once the meeting concluded, the officers and the residents exchanged contact information and chatted.

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NCO’S (NEIGHBORHOOD COORDINATION OFFICERS) CRACKING DOWN ON THUG AUTO BODY SHOPS TAKE OVER OF MERRICK BLVD – AND THEY NEED YOUR HELP TO STOP THIS BULLSHIT THAT HAS BEEN GOING ON TOO LONG

Thug Auto Body Shop at 102-80 Merrick

So concerned residents of Jamaica, do you want to be just innocent bystanders who just bitch, but do nothing or are just victims of all the nonsense in the area or do you want to be the eyes and ears of your community and put a stop to the nonsense and bullshit that has been going on way too long in this community,  like the take over of the thug auto body shops of our sidewalks, side streets and the right hand lane of Merrick Blvd.

This bus had to move into another lane due to auto body shop blocking the lane.

WHY are you folks, especially those that live in that area between 104 Ave and 110th Ave, where these auto body shops have completely taken over and cause major safety issues on Merrick Blvd, putting up with this daily and ILLEGAL nonsense. DO SOMETHING.

The other day while driving during rush hour on Merrick Blvd, several auto body shops along that stretch had the right land completely blocked with vehicles, so that cars, buses, etc all had to be bottle-neck into the left hand land causing a major safety issue. BUT this is not a isolated incident, this is a daily issue with these outlaw shops that our local elected officials, including Councilman Miller, whose office is over that way, have done nothing for years on this issue.

So now with the great NCO (Neighborhood Coordination Officers) program, which was put into place in October of 2016, these officers are cracking down on these shops and other quality of life issues, BUT, you need to take a more proactive stance and be the eyes and ears of the precincts to let them know whenever you see such bullshit. For more on this great program, read https://cleanupjamaicaqueens.wordpress.com/2017/05/18/month-of-june-is-get-to-know-your-neighborhood-community-officers-help-put-a-stop-to-the-damn-nonsense-in-the-jamaica-community/.

Know which sector you live in and which officers are in your sector, but you do not need to live in that particular sector if you see an issue, you can still report it to those NCO’s.

The sector where these outlaw body shops are operating in is Sector D and the officers for that sector are Office Matthew Langone (matthew.langone@NYPD.org & 929.248.0463 and Officer Michael Henderson. I contacted them via email about that issue the other day when I was in a car and they responded swiftly:

 

            As of right now Officer Henderson and myself have spoken with owners of the auto body shops involved regarding the issues on Merrick Boulevard.  We have issued five summonses and have had two cars marked by sanitation to be towed away. All other vehicles that were double parked or on sidewalks have been moved and warnings have been issued.  We will be in the vicinity frequently and will continue to summons and tow vehicles until the problem is completely taken care of.  Please let us know if you have any further issues, thanks you.

POLICE OFFICER MATTHEW J. LANGONE

New York City Police Department

103 Precinct NCO Sector David

Cell #: (929) 248-0463

E-Mail: Matthew.Langone@NYPD.ORG

So USE THIS PROGRAM, IT WORKS. They handle all quality of life issues relating to NYPD issues. Issues like those auto body shops, illegal truck driving on residential streets, illegal parking of tractor trailer trucks, noise issues such as fireworks and loud music, constant loitering involving drug dealing or other criminal activity. Any issues that falls under NYPD (sorry no garbage issues, that is DOS).

So get to know your NCO’s and attend meetings this month and introduce yourself and bring up quality of life issues that you are dealing with. These meeting are scheduled to be quarterly.

I can personally say that my NCO’s, Officers York and Sclafani have been amazing in my area. They pretty much have put a gigantic dent in the illegal truck driving on my residential street and are now working on the issue of trucks parking in the LIRR overpass tunnels south of Archer.

I cannot praise this program or the officers involved in it. Yesterday, I attended another meeting for Sector B, where the drug clinic on Hillside Ave and 175th has been an issue since it moved there last year.

So just don’t be a victim, take a pro-active stance and take back your block, your neighborhood, your community. Take back Jamaica from those who want to make your life miserable.

There are two more meeting this month:

► Sector Charlie (between the Van Wyck Expressway and 157th Street and between Archer and 110th avenues) — Tuesday, June 20, at the Concerned Parents of Jamaica Early Learning Center at 143-04 101 Ave.(NCO’s assigned to monitor Sutphin Boulevard will also be there).

► Sector David (between 157th Street and Francis Lewis Boulevard and between Archer and 110th avenues) — Thursday, June 15, at the South Hollis Library at 204-01 Hollis Ave. (NCO’s assigned to the South Jamaica Houses will also attend).

All meetings will begin at 7 p.m. and doors will open at 6:30 p.m.

ATTEND THEM. Be active in your community.

THURSDAY, JUNE 8, 7PM AT SUSAN B. ANTHONY ACADEMY (88-15 182 ST): GET TO KNOW YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD COMMUNITY OFFICERS IN SECTOR B OF JAMAICA & BRING UP THE PROBLEMATIC DRUG CLINIC AT HILLSIDE AVE & 175TH

I have posted this before, but just a reminder to those interested. The next NCO meeting Thursday, June 8th for Sector B in Jamaica will be held at the Susan B. Anthony Academy at Hillside Ave & 182 St. For those in other sectors, read below and see when  your meeting will take place and where.

Sector B covers between 175th Street and Francis Lewis Boulevard and between Hillside and Archer avenues. So if  you are in this area or have issues in this area, come Thursday night to meet your NCO’s from the 103rd precinct, Officer Erica Cotto: erica.cotto@nypd.org  & Officer John Iadevaio: john.iadevaio@nypd.org.

This is a good meeting to bring up the issue of the problematic drug clinic at Hillside Avenue & 175th St, which that establishment is NOT providing the proper security to keep their unruly clientele in line, many who are not even from the area.

MONTH OF JUNE IS “GET TO KNOW YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD COMMUNITY OFFICERS”

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Meet Your Beat Officers at Safety Summits in Jamaica

By Ewa Kern-Jedrychowska | May 16, 2017 8:25am

 Neighborhood Coordination Officers giving out toys to kids at the South Jamaica Houses earlier this year.

Neighborhood Coordination Officers giving out toys to kids at the South Jamaica Houses earlier this year.View Full Caption

103rd Precinct/Twitter

QUEENS — Jamaica residents will soon get to discuss a variety of problems they would like to see fixed in their neighborhood during a series of “Safety Summit Meetings” with officers assigned to monitor specific areas of the precinct, police officials said.

Eight of the “neighborhood coordination officers,” or NCOs, have been assigned to four newly created patrol sectors in the 103rd Precinct, where they work all their shifts, getting to know local residents and business owners, as part of a new community policing program which was introduced in the 103rd Precinct in October.

Six additional NCOs were also assigned to monitor the South Jamaica Houses, Jamaica Avenue and Sutphin Boulevard.

When the program, seeking to improve the relationship between the community and the police department, was introduced to the area last year, the 103rd Precinct immediately saw a significant drop in overall crime numbers, officials said.

The officers have since met with local residents during various community events and informal meetings, as well as during the monthly 103rd Precinct Community Council meeting.

But this time, meetings with the NCOs will be organized in each of the four sectors in order to discuss crime and quality of life issues related to each of the specific areas, police officials said.

“They are going to be speaking about issues in the sector where they work and everybody who lives there is welcome to come, work with the NCOs, come up with issues and ideas about how to fix the problem,” said Inspector John Cappelmann, the commanding officer of the 103rd Precinct, during a recent community council meeting.

Check the complete schedule of the upcoming meetings with the Jamaica NCOs below: 

► Sector Adam (between the Van Wyck Expressway and 175th Street and between Hillside and Archer avenues) — Tuesday, June 6, at the Central Library at 89-11 Merrick Blvd.

► Sector Boy (between 175th Street and Francis Lewis Boulevard and between Hillside and Archer avenues) — Thursday, June 8, at I.S. 238 Susan B. Anthony Academy at 88-15 182 St.

► Sector Charlie (between the Van Wyck Expressway and 157th Street and between Archer and 110th avenues) — Tuesday, June 20, at the Concerned Parents of Jamaica Early Learning Center at 143-04 101 Ave.(NCO’s assigned to monitor Sutphin Boulevard will also be there).

► Sector David (between 157th Street and Francis Lewis Boulevard and between Archer and 110th avenues) — Thursday, June 15, at the South Hollis Library at 204-01 Hollis Ave. (NCO’s assigned to the South Jamaica Houses will also attend).

All meetings will begin at 7 p.m. and doors will open at 6:30 p.m.

TUESDAY, JUNE 6, 7PM AT MERRICK CENTRAL LIBRARY: GET TO KNOW YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD COMMUNITY OFFICERS IN SECTOR A OF JAMAICA

I have posted this before, but just a reminder to those interested. Tuesday, June 6th’s meeting for Sector A in Jamaica will be held at the Merrick Central Library. For those in other sectors, read below and see when  your meeting will take place and where.

Sector A covers between the Van Wyck Expressway and 175th Street and between Hillside and Archer avenues. So if  you are in this area, come Tuesday night to meeting your NCO’s from the 103rd precinct, two great officers (Officer Louis York (louis.york@nypd.org) & Officer Adam Sclafani (adam.sclafani@nypd.org) ) that I have gotten to know and work with since the inception of the program last October.

MONTH OF JUNE IS “GET TO KNOW YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD COMMUNITY OFFICERS”

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From DNAInfo New York:

Meet Your Beat Officers at Safety Summits in Jamaica

By Ewa Kern-Jedrychowska | May 16, 2017 8:25am

 Neighborhood Coordination Officers giving out toys to kids at the South Jamaica Houses earlier this year.

Neighborhood Coordination Officers giving out toys to kids at the South Jamaica Houses earlier this year.View Full Caption

103rd Precinct/Twitter

QUEENS — Jamaica residents will soon get to discuss a variety of problems they would like to see fixed in their neighborhood during a series of “Safety Summit Meetings” with officers assigned to monitor specific areas of the precinct, police officials said.

Eight of the “neighborhood coordination officers,” or NCOs, have been assigned to four newly created patrol sectors in the 103rd Precinct, where they work all their shifts, getting to know local residents and business owners, as part of a new community policing program which was introduced in the 103rd Precinct in October.

Six additional NCOs were also assigned to monitor the South Jamaica Houses, Jamaica Avenue and Sutphin Boulevard.

When the program, seeking to improve the relationship between the community and the police department, was introduced to the area last year, the 103rd Precinct immediately saw a significant drop in overall crime numbers, officials said.

The officers have since met with local residents during various community events and informal meetings, as well as during the monthly 103rd Precinct Community Council meeting.

But this time, meetings with the NCOs will be organized in each of the four sectors in order to discuss crime and quality of life issues related to each of the specific areas, police officials said.

“They are going to be speaking about issues in the sector where they work and everybody who lives there is welcome to come, work with the NCOs, come up with issues and ideas about how to fix the problem,” said Inspector John Cappelmann, the commanding officer of the 103rd Precinct, during a recent community council meeting.

Check the complete schedule of the upcoming meetings with the Jamaica NCOs below: 

► Sector Adam (between the Van Wyck Expressway and 175th Street and between Hillside and Archer avenues) — Tuesday, June 6, at the Central Library at 89-11 Merrick Blvd.

► Sector Boy (between 175th Street and Francis Lewis Boulevard and between Hillside and Archer avenues) — Thursday, June 8, at I.S. 238 Susan B. Anthony Academy at 88-15 182 St.

► Sector Charlie (between the Van Wyck Expressway and 157th Street and between Archer and 110th avenues) — Tuesday, June 20, at the Concerned Parents of Jamaica Early Learning Center at 143-04 101 Ave.(NCO’s assigned to monitor Sutphin Boulevard will also be there).

► Sector David (between 157th Street and Francis Lewis Boulevard and between Archer and 110th avenues) — Thursday, June 15, at the South Hollis Library at 204-01 Hollis Ave. (NCO’s assigned to the South Jamaica Houses will also attend).

All meetings will begin at 7 p.m. and doors will open at 6:30 p.m.

MONTH OF JUNE IS “GET TO KNOW YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD COMMUNITY OFFICERS” & HELP PUT A STOP TO THE DAMN NONSENSE IN THE JAMAICA COMMUNITY

What a GREAT program folks, so damn it, USE IT, instead of just complaining among yourselves. Get to know your “Neighborhood Community Officers” in your areas. They can help with so many issues (NYPD issues, so no garbage problems). Illegal truck driving on residential streets, illegal commercial truck parking, auto body shops take over of public sidewalks/streets, ice cream trucks blaring their damn jingle while parked (NOTE: ice cream trucks can only play the jingle when they are  in motion, NOT WHEN THEY ARE STOPPED, which is ILLEGAL and has high fines), loud noise such as huge speakers outside in back yards late at night or cars parked in front of your building while people hang out and blast music, Fireworks that start in this community Memorial Day and go through labor day – FIREWORKS ARE ILLEGAL IN NYC. You name a quality of life issue that pertains to NYPD, then your NCO’s can help and boy, do they get the job done. This reminds me of back in the days where the beat cops knew the people in the community and the community got to know them and they knew the good guys from the bad guys.

My two NCO’s, Officer Louis York (louis.york@nypd.org) & Officer Adam Sclafani (adam.sclafani@nypd.org) have been just amazing and have hit the ground running since the program was implemented back in October of 2016 in the 103rd. They have put a stop to the illegal truck driving on my residential street right from the get go and have been working hard on the auto body shops in the area who place junked and unlicensed vehicles up on sidewalks and on the public streets. They seem to really care about working on the quality of life issues that have plagued the area for way too long and getting to know the people in the community. And since the majority of their job is focusing on quality of life issues, they will not have to put complaints on hold to do other things. They communicate with me on a regular basis and always keep me informed of the status of my complaints and issues. I cannot praise this program enough and my NCO’s, York and Sclafani. This has been a long time coming.

So STOP BITCHING FOR THE SAKE OF BITCHING and take back your community and stop thinking that all the ghetto bullshit/nonsense is just normal for this community, because IT IS NOT. And even though our local elected officials are totally useless, have no balls, don’t stand up for the community or the constituents who put them in office, STILL file complaints with them as well, don’t let them off the hook since we pay their over-bloated salaries. BUT if you want problems to be actually addressed quickly and solved, speak to your NCO’s in your area.

Find out your area’s upcoming meetings and ATTEND THEM:

► Sector Adam (between the Van Wyck Expressway and 175th Street and between Hillside and Archer avenues) — Tuesday, June 6, at the Central Library at 89-11 Merrick Blvd.

► Sector Boy (between 175th Street and Francis Lewis Boulevard and between Hillside and Archer avenues) — Thursday, June 8, at I.S. 238 Susan B. Anthony Academy at 88-15 182 St.

► Sector Charlie (between the Van Wyck Expressway and 157th Street and between Archer and 110th avenues) — Tuesday, June 20, at the Concerned Parents of Jamaica Early Learning Center at 143-04 101 Ave.(NCO’s assigned to monitor Sutphin Boulevard will also be there).

► Sector David (between 157th Street and Francis Lewis Boulevard and between Archer and 110th avenues) — Thursday, June 15, at the South Hollis Library at 204-01 Hollis Ave. (NCO’s assigned to the South Jamaica Houses will also attend).

All meetings will begin at 7 p.m. and doors will open at 6:30 p.m.

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From DNAInfo New York:

Meet Your Beat Officers at Safety Summits in Jamaica

By Ewa Kern-Jedrychowska | May 16, 2017 8:25am

 Neighborhood Coordination Officers giving out toys to kids at the South Jamaica Houses earlier this year.

Neighborhood Coordination Officers giving out toys to kids at the South Jamaica Houses earlier this year.View Full Caption

103rd Precinct/Twitter

QUEENS — Jamaica residents will soon get to discuss a variety of problems they would like to see fixed in their neighborhood during a series of “Safety Summit Meetings” with officers assigned to monitor specific areas of the precinct, police officials said.

Eight of the “neighborhood coordination officers,” or NCOs, have been assigned to four newly created patrol sectors in the 103rd Precinct, where they work all their shifts, getting to know local residents and business owners, as part of a new community policing program which was introduced in the 103rd Precinct in October.

Six additional NCOs were also assigned to monitor the South Jamaica Houses, Jamaica Avenue and Sutphin Boulevard.

When the program, seeking to improve the relationship between the community and the police department, was introduced to the area last year, the 103rd Precinct immediately saw a significant drop in overall crime numbers, officials said.

The officers have since met with local residents during various community events and informal meetings, as well as during the monthly 103rd Precinct Community Council meeting.

But this time, meetings with the NCOs will be organized in each of the four sectors in order to discuss crime and quality of life issues related to each of the specific areas, police officials said.

“They are going to be speaking about issues in the sector where they work and everybody who lives there is welcome to come, work with the NCOs, come up with issues and ideas about how to fix the problem,” said Inspector John Cappelmann, the commanding officer of the 103rd Precinct, during a recent community council meeting.

Check the complete schedule of the upcoming meetings with the Jamaica NCOs below: 

► Sector Adam (between the Van Wyck Expressway and 175th Street and between Hillside and Archer avenues) — Tuesday, June 6, at the Central Library at 89-11 Merrick Blvd.

► Sector Boy (between 175th Street and Francis Lewis Boulevard and between Hillside and Archer avenues) — Thursday, June 8, at I.S. 238 Susan B. Anthony Academy at 88-15 182 St.

► Sector Charlie (between the Van Wyck Expressway and 157th Street and between Archer and 110th avenues) — Tuesday, June 20, at the Concerned Parents of Jamaica Early Learning Center at 143-04 101 Ave.(NCO’s assigned to monitor Sutphin Boulevard will also be there).

► Sector David (between 157th Street and Francis Lewis Boulevard and between Archer and 110th avenues) — Thursday, June 15, at the South Hollis Library at 204-01 Hollis Ave. (NCO’s assigned to the South Jamaica Houses will also attend).

All meetings will begin at 7 p.m. and doors will open at 6:30 p.m.

 

From The Daily News:

EXCLUSIVE: For first time NYPD program will connect communities to their sector rank-and-file officers

Mayor Bill de Blasio, left, and Police Commissioner James O’Neill. “This gives people the chance to give us feedback in regularly scheduled meetings,” O’Neill told the Daily News.

(James Keivom/New York Daily News)

The NYPD will announce on Tuesday a program that promises to bring cops closer to the people they serve — allowing rank-and-file officers for the first time to hold community meetings in the sectors they patrol.Police officials say the seemingly simple plan represents a radical change in the normally buttoned-up NYPD culture.Four pilot meetings were held in March, but the quarterly informal gatherings begin in earnest in the 44th Precinct in the Bronx. There are 166 more meetings on tap through July in the 43 precincts that now have neighborhood coordination officers, or NCOs.“We’ve been talking about building trust,” Police Commissioner James O’Neill told the Daily News. “This gives people the chance to give us feedback in regularly scheduled meetings. It’s also important to show the cops that we respect them and trust them.”

Left to right, Monique Porter, Center Director of the PAL Wynn Center on Gates Avenue, Police Officer John Buchanan and Police Officer Robert Bramble outside the 79th Precinct station house in Brooklyn.

(Gardiner Anderson/for New York Daily News)

Eventually every police command in the city will have the meetings with the goals of improving community ties, addressing quality-of-life issues and solving crime. And precinct bosses — they promise — won’t be there breathing down patrol officers’ necks, Chief of Patrol Terence Monahan said.

“We’re trying to reach out to get the population who lives there and works there to show up and interact with our cops,” he said. “It’s all about humanizing them — humanizing the community and humanizing our cops.”

The program is a change from the Precinct Community Council system that has been the NYPD model dating to the 1950s, in which precinct commanders hold monthly meetings.

 A drawback to the old model is that most precincts have populations the size of small cities, and the commanders can’t possibly address every issue that comes up.

“Before, I think it was popular to paint us all with one brush, but allowing people to interact and get to know their officers personally lets people know all officers are not the same,” Officer Bramble said.

(Gardiner Anderson/for New York Daily News)

Each sector has a more manageable average of 28,000 people in it — with the largest on the Upper East Side with 81,000 people and the smallest in Midtown North with 1,700 people, said NYPD adviser John Linder. He called the meetings a “cultural transformation” that will give cops more discretion and increase public trust.

“We’re taking a big situation and making it smaller and easier to analyze and oversee,” said Assistant Chief Rodney Harrison, operational commander of the NCO program. “Instead of having one meeting, now there are four or five. Rather than top-down, it’s going right to the same persons who are going to solve the problem.”

About 50 people attended the first pilot meeting at 44th Precinct in March, and 20 to 30 people showed up at the other three. Officials believe smaller crowds are actually better because they make it easier for people to interact.

“You’ll have some precincts where more people will come than others, but you’ve got to start somewhere,” O’Neill said. “When people see they will have real input into what’s going on in the meetings, we think the turnout will increase.”

The NCO program, which began in four precincts in May 2015, is already having an effect. As of May 7, shootings were down 18.9% in the precincts with the programs, down to 180 from 222 in 2016. Shootings in the rest of the precincts are up by two cases.

Citywide, the number of shootings is down by 17.7% — 225 this year compared to 265 last year — meaning that NCO precincts are driving the decline.

The NCO program is now in more than half the city’s commands, including housing commands. The program aims to link cops and members of the community to reduce crime.

Still, Harrison and Monahan said selling the meeting program to some commanders has been a challenge.

“Compstat at one point was a way of evaluating your performance,” Harrison said. “And if you’re an old school executive, that’s still kind of stuck in your mind. We’re not going in that direction anymore, so that’s one of the biggest struggles.”

“We’re able to sit here and have a conversation with you,” Officer Buchanan said. “It’s the village concept coming back,” said Monique Porter.

(Gardiner Anderson/for New York Daily News)

The launch of the sector meeting program will correspond with an ad campaign funded by the Police Foundation.

Software executive Charles Phillips, a member of the Police Foundation Board, said the multimillion ad campaign was necessary to draw people to the meeting.

“We thought that getting the word out was critical,” Phillips, 57, said. “The culture is changing and moving forward. It’s very good for the city.”

Meetings will be listed on the buildtheblock.nyc website starting Tuesday.

“For years, I don’t think our cops were able to use their discretion to solve problems on their own,” Monahan said. “This is about us as a department allowing our cops to kind of finally have this role and prove to them that we’re not kidding.”

The cops are judged by their sector crime numbers. Commanders also hold them accountable for how well they deal with problems the community brings them.

For NCO Officers John Buchanan and Robert Bramble, both 25 and assigned to the 79th Precinct in Brooklyn, the program is helping change the perception of the cops.

“Before, I think it was popular to paint us all with one brush, but allowing people to interact and get to know their officers personally lets people know all officers are not the same,” Bramble said.

“We’re able to sit here and have a conversation with you,” Buchanan said. “That was unheard of when we first started.”

The cops participated in one of the pilot meetings in March, and found it useful, as did Monique Porter, 48, director of the Bedford-Stuyvesant Police Athletic League.

“It’s the village concept coming back,” she said. “They wanted to hear what was going on and they were able to hone in on the issues. If someone was talking about a crime, they would know the street they were talking about. They knew people there. They are really reaching out.”

 

UPDATE: ILLEGALLY PARKED VEHICLE WITH “NYPD” ON DASH BLOCKING FIRE HYDRANT ACTUALLY BELONGS TO “NON NYPD” INDIVIDUAL IN SUFFOLK COUNTY – BIG THANKS TO THE NEIGHBORHOOD COMMUNITY COORDINATION OFFICERS

Well, the vehicle with NYPD on the dash that had been illegally parked for two weeks blocking a fire hydrant at 172nd St and Hillside Avenue turns out to NOT be NYPD, which I suspected from the get-go due to the  location and the amount of time that car was there.

After talking to my 103rd precinct NCO (Neighborhood Community Officers), Sclafani and York, two really great guys who focus on the area between Hillside Avenue and the LIRR train tracks & 175th Street to the Van Wyck focusing on all quality of life issues, they looked into this after the failed 311 complaints and found out that the plates on the vehicle came back to a location in Suffolk County and Community Affairs Detective, Marc Costa (another great guy) sent out a letter warning of consequences for future parking there.  Detective Costa also stated that NYPD on the dash was not a decal but on a vest to make it appear it was NYPD personnel when in fact this individual has nothing to do with NYDP. This is not the first time I have seen vehicles in the area parked illegally for days and weeks using this bogus NYPD item.

Speaking of Neighborhood Community Officers or the Program, if you are not familiar with it, YOU SHOULD (http://www1.nyc.gov/office-of-the-mayor/news/646-16/mayor-de-blasio-commissioner-bratton-expansion-neighborhood-policing-program-51). It is a program in many precincts where two officers cover a particular area in the district and they focus on all types of quality of life issue from illegal truck driving to noise and everything in between. They pretty much wipe out the middle man of 311. So you should get to know your NCO’s in your area and you can find that out by speaking with your precinct’s community affairs department.

So if you live in the area of Jamaica that I mentioned above, please contact those officers with your issues (they don’t handle garbage issues though) but like I said they cover illegal parking, illegal truck driving on residential streets (they pretty much put an end to the illegal truck driving on my street), illegal truck parking and a host of other quality of life issues.

Sitting down with Officers Sclafani and York the other day, they informed me of some other issues they are working on. They have contacted all the auto body shops in their area to inform them that there will be no more illegal parking of junked and unlicensed vehicles on the streets and sidewalk and paid a visit to the shop on Archer Ave and 149th. They will be confiscating all loud speakers and microphones that blast either music or talk in front of the stores in downtown Jamaica (which by the way is ILLEGAL). They are working with Sanitation to make sure that sidewalks are not being blocked by racks of merchandise as well. Stores can only place merchandise 3 feet into the sidewalk from the front of their store (Pretty Girl is the biggest culprit and that store is one of several in their sites). They are also working with DOT to put up NO PARKING signs inside all the LIRR Tunnels in their district, which has become a major safety issues,  especially with the large tractor trailer trucks parking there. They are also aware that ice cream trucks cannot play their loud music while they are parked or idling, only when they are in motion and will be on the look-out for that come the warm weather.

Totally Illegal blocking of sidewalk. Pretty Girl is one of many stores on Jamaica Ave doing this. Besides making it difficult to manuever, it is low-class ghetto/third world country EYESORE. On NCO’s radar.

147th Pl between Jamaica & Archer Ave. 5.20.16. NOW on the NCO’s radar.

So again, get to know who your NCO’s are in your district. The 103rd precinct program started in October 2016 and I immediately got to know Officers Sclafani and York and cannot tell you how helpful they have been and how on top of issues they are. BUT you folks must play your part as well and be concerned citizens because, there are some new sheriffs in Jamaica “Dodge City” and they don’t play around. For those in the area I mentioned, if you need these NCO’s contact information, just let me know. All others contact your local precinct.

 

103RD PRECINCT CRACKING DOWN ON QUALITY OF LIFE ISSUES IN JAMAICA INCLUDING AUTO-BODY SHOPS ILLEGALLY PARKED VEHICLES

Image result for 103rd precinct

If I have to say anything positive about Jamaica, it is the 103rd precinct, a work-horse of a precinct and one of the busiest outside of the Times Square precinct and they do not piss around folks. In the article below:

Sgt. David Strom, supervisor of the precinct’s NCO program, said since October the precinct has towed 75 illegally parked vehicles. He also said they “are working on a letter” for owners of auto repair shops, body shops and used-car dealerships defining what places are and are not acceptable for parking vehicles when conducting their businesses.

They have been extremely helpful working with me on the illegal truck driving on my street and the illegal parking by auto body shops and car dealers in the area. The new NCO program  (The Neighborhood Coordination Officers)  focuses entirely on quality of life issues  and they have been great. Each section of Jamaica has two NCO’s and mine are Officers Sclafani and York and they are amazing, always keeping in touch with me and always giving me updates of what they are doing in regards to my complaints, I even have the one officer’s cell phone, how great is that. All the precincts in the Jamaica area have NCO’s and you should definitely get to know yours in your specific area. Here are some of what they have relayed to me regarding some of my complaints:

The NYPD will be placing an electronic sign at that location stating “No trucks, all trucks must use 168 street”. That sign will be there for about a month, after that flyers will be handed out to the public.  The last phase will be issuing a summons.

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Good Morning,

  Myself and officer York have spoken to the auto body shops located within our sector which is the Van Wyck to 175 street and Hillside Ave to the train tracks, we advised all those shops that any vehicles that did not have plates on them (correct plates of course) and are located on the street will be towed.  Also we mentioned to the businesses that no vehicles are allowed to be placed onto side walks, any vehicles that are located on sidewalks will be ticketed.  I also forwarded the email to the NCO’s that are in charge of the sector that covers Merrick Blvd.  Starting tomorrow we will be making rounds to ensure that those vehicles were moved.  I will also reach out to the truck company regarding the email about 170 street.  Thank you and have a good day.

Po Sclafani 103 Precinct

Just an update on the issue of illegally parked vehicles at auto body shops in Sector A.  As of last week there were a total of 7 vehicles towed from the auto body shop located at 149-15 Archer Avenue, vehicles were either parked on the sidewalk or were parked on the street with no license plates or incorrect license plates.  All other shops have been spoken to and appear to be complying.

PO Sclafani

103 Precinct

Just an update on the parking condition that we spoke of, As of January 5th there has been a total of 13 vehicles towed from sector A.  Those vehicles were either parked on a public street with no license plates or were parked on sidewalks.  Majority of the vehicles were towed from 149-15 Archer Avenue.  The other auto body shops in sector A have been keeping vehicles off the streets and keeping them in private lots or inside of their shops.  Any other concerns feel free to contact myself or Officer York.

Get to know your areas NCO’s, which you can do by contacting your precinct’s community affairs officer. For the 103rd precinct the community affairs officer is Detective Marc Costa and remember the 103rd has several NCO’s who cover different areas of Jamaica and if your complaint falls outside of their area, they will forward your complaint to a NCO who handles that area.

They handle all quality of life issues from illegal parking & illegal truck driving to noise complaint and all that falls in between.

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From Queens Chronicle:

Cops, storm tough on crime in 103rd

24-hour stretch with no major cases

 

Posted: Thursday, January 12, 2017 10:30 am

As commanding officer of the 103rd Precinct in Jamaica, Inspector John Cappelmann takes a back seat to no commander in the NYPD when it comes to pride in his officers’ hard work and achievement.

But that doesn’t mean he won’t accept help from time to time, especially when it falls into his lap.

 Last weekend, that assistance came in the form of a snowstorm last Saturday that dropped 8.2 inches on parts of the borough.

“We went 24 hours without a major crime, what we call an index crime,” Cappelmann said Tuesday night, speaking at the monthly meeting of the precinct’s community council.

Index crimes include murder, rape, robbery, burglary, felony assault, grand larceny and auto theft.

With a new year, the inspector said the precinct ended 1016 with a 7.7 percent drop in overall crime from 2015, with reductions in all categories but robberies, where the total went from 385 to 387.

Shooting incidents went from 18 to 32, ending three years of near-record low totals. Cappelmann said shootings averaged in the mid-30s every year from 2009 to 2013 before dropping off to 17 in 2014 and 18 in 2015.

The 28-day statistics as of this week saw a decrease of 33.8 percent in major crimes over the same time period last year.

The CO credited his officers with a major arrest in the month of December as a result of Vision Zero traffic enforcement.

On Dec. 1, two officers stopped a vehicle on 91st Street.

“It was a traffic line enforcement stop,” he said. “And there on the back seat was a loaded AK-47, and a couple of loaded magazines.”

Cappelmann said the man, a Brooklyn resident, was arrested without incident for unlawful possession of a weapon, and has not been very talkative about why he was traveling with the weapon and ammunition.

“We don’t know where he was going,” he said. “But it probably wasn’t good.”

Sgt. David Strom, supervisor of the precinct’s NCO program, said since October the precinct has towed 75 illegally parked vehicles. He also said they “are working on a letter” for owners of auto repair shops, body shops and used-car dealerships defining what places are and are not acceptable for parking vehicles when conducting their businesses.

Strom also said they are getting more and more complaints about financial scams.

He said one growing in popularity among crooks involves calling people and telling them they have won a lottery prize, but first must send money to cover taxes. He said no legitimate lottery operates that way, and reminded people that they have not won a lottery for which they have not purchased a ticket.

“You can’t be not in it and win it,” he said.

People also are hearing from those claiming to be the FBI, the Internal Revenue Service or other government agencies either calling or sending a message freezing a cell phone saying the person owes taxes or a civil fine.

The giveaway, he said, is the demand to make payment in gift cards readily available in many stores.

“The IRS does not call; we all know that,” he said. “And no government agency will ever demand payment in gift cards.”

He said some hucksters are preying on people with so-called “money blessing” scams in which the victim is asked to bring a large amount of cash to be blessed so that it will double.

“But when you get home and unwrap the bundle, it’s filled with newspaper, and that person is out their money,” the sergeant said.